Bilateral risk for subsequent breast cancer after lobular carcinoma-in-situ: Analysis of surveillance, epidemiology, and end results data

Paul J. Chuba, Merlin R. Hamre, Johnny Yap, Richard K. Severson, David Lucas, Falah Shamsa, Amr Aref

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

194 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Noninvasive lesions involving the lobules of the breast are increasingly diagnosed as incidental microscopic findings at the time of lumpectomy or core-needle biopsy. We investigated the incidence rates of invasive breast cancer (IBC) after a diagnosis of lobular carcinoma-in-situ (LCIS) by using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data. Patients and Methods: Patients (N = 4,853) having a diagnosis of primary LCIS in the time period of 1973 to 1998 were identified using the SEER Public Use CD-ROM data. The database was then searched for patients with subsequent primary IBC occurrences (n = 350). The clinical and pathologic characteristics of patients with subsequent primary IBCs were compared with the characteristics of patients with primary IBCs attained during the same time period (N = 255,114). Results: The incidence of IBC increased over time from diagnosis of LCIS, with 7.1% ± 0.5% incidence of IBC at 10 years. IBCs detected after partial mastectomy occurred in either breast (46% ipsilateral and 54% contralateral); however, after mastectomy, most IBCs were contralateral (94.7%). IBCs occurring after LCIS more often represented invasive lobular histology (23.1%) compared with primary IBCs (6.5%). The standardized incidence ratio (the ratio of observed to expected cases) for developing IBC was 2.4 (95% Cl, 2.1 to 2.6) adjusted for age and year of diagnosis. Conclusion: LCIS is associated with increased risk of subsequent invasive disease, with equal predisposition in either breast. The minimum risk of developing IBC after LCIS is 7.1% at 10 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5534-5541
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume23
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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