Bethanidine sulfate

Efficacy in prevention of ventricular trachyarrhythmias during programmed stimulation. Report of a multicenter study of 56 patients

S. L. Teichman, L. E. Waspe, J. A. Matos, Soo G. Kim, John Devens Fisher

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Abstract

Twelve cardiac electrophysiology centers conducted an open label prospective trial of bethanidine sulfate, an oral bretylium analog, for the prevention of ventricular trachyarrhythmias during programmed electrical stimulation. This study group included 56 patients (44 men, 12 women; mean age 60 years; 55 with structural heart disease). Sixteen patients had both ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, 30 had ventricular trachycardia alone and 10 had ventricular fibrillation alone. Programmed stimulation on no antiarrhythmic drugs induced sustained ventricular tachycardia in 46 patients, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 4 patients and ventricular fibrillation in 6 patients. During programmed ventricular stimulation after 59 trials of 20 to 30 mg/kg body weight of oral bethanidine (acute dosing in 40 patients, and divided dosing over 24 hours in 19 patients), no ventricular tachyarrhythmias were inducible in 6 patients (11%), sustained ventricular tachycardia was converted to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 3 patients (5%), ventricular tachyarrhythmias remained inducible in 39 patients (70%) and spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias occurred more frequently in 4 patients (7%). Side effects prevented repeat testing in four patients. The 10 patients presenting with only ventricular fibrillation appeared to have a higher response rate: no ventricular tachyarrhythmias were inducible in 2 patients and sustained ventricular tachycardia was converted to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 2 patients. Despite protriptyline administration in 54 of 59 bethanidine trials, symptomatic hypotension occurred in 30 trials (51%). In conclusion, the efficacy of bethanidine for preventing ventricular tachyarrhythmias as assessed by programmed stimulation is low. Patients presenting with only ventricular fibrillation may have a more favorable response to bethanidine sulfate. Symptomatic hypotension occurs frequently despite concomitant use of protriptyline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)510-517
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985

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Bethanidine
Multicenter Studies
Ventricular Tachycardia
Ventricular Fibrillation
Tachycardia
Protriptyline
Hypotension
Cardiac Electrophysiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

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title = "Bethanidine sulfate: Efficacy in prevention of ventricular trachyarrhythmias during programmed stimulation. Report of a multicenter study of 56 patients",
abstract = "Twelve cardiac electrophysiology centers conducted an open label prospective trial of bethanidine sulfate, an oral bretylium analog, for the prevention of ventricular trachyarrhythmias during programmed electrical stimulation. This study group included 56 patients (44 men, 12 women; mean age 60 years; 55 with structural heart disease). Sixteen patients had both ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, 30 had ventricular trachycardia alone and 10 had ventricular fibrillation alone. Programmed stimulation on no antiarrhythmic drugs induced sustained ventricular tachycardia in 46 patients, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 4 patients and ventricular fibrillation in 6 patients. During programmed ventricular stimulation after 59 trials of 20 to 30 mg/kg body weight of oral bethanidine (acute dosing in 40 patients, and divided dosing over 24 hours in 19 patients), no ventricular tachyarrhythmias were inducible in 6 patients (11{\%}), sustained ventricular tachycardia was converted to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 3 patients (5{\%}), ventricular tachyarrhythmias remained inducible in 39 patients (70{\%}) and spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias occurred more frequently in 4 patients (7{\%}). Side effects prevented repeat testing in four patients. The 10 patients presenting with only ventricular fibrillation appeared to have a higher response rate: no ventricular tachyarrhythmias were inducible in 2 patients and sustained ventricular tachycardia was converted to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 2 patients. Despite protriptyline administration in 54 of 59 bethanidine trials, symptomatic hypotension occurred in 30 trials (51{\%}). In conclusion, the efficacy of bethanidine for preventing ventricular tachyarrhythmias as assessed by programmed stimulation is low. Patients presenting with only ventricular fibrillation may have a more favorable response to bethanidine sulfate. Symptomatic hypotension occurs frequently despite concomitant use of protriptyline.",
author = "Teichman, {S. L.} and Waspe, {L. E.} and Matos, {J. A.} and Kim, {Soo G.} and Fisher, {John Devens}",
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T2 - Efficacy in prevention of ventricular trachyarrhythmias during programmed stimulation. Report of a multicenter study of 56 patients

AU - Teichman, S. L.

AU - Waspe, L. E.

AU - Matos, J. A.

AU - Kim, Soo G.

AU - Fisher, John Devens

PY - 1985

Y1 - 1985

N2 - Twelve cardiac electrophysiology centers conducted an open label prospective trial of bethanidine sulfate, an oral bretylium analog, for the prevention of ventricular trachyarrhythmias during programmed electrical stimulation. This study group included 56 patients (44 men, 12 women; mean age 60 years; 55 with structural heart disease). Sixteen patients had both ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, 30 had ventricular trachycardia alone and 10 had ventricular fibrillation alone. Programmed stimulation on no antiarrhythmic drugs induced sustained ventricular tachycardia in 46 patients, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 4 patients and ventricular fibrillation in 6 patients. During programmed ventricular stimulation after 59 trials of 20 to 30 mg/kg body weight of oral bethanidine (acute dosing in 40 patients, and divided dosing over 24 hours in 19 patients), no ventricular tachyarrhythmias were inducible in 6 patients (11%), sustained ventricular tachycardia was converted to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 3 patients (5%), ventricular tachyarrhythmias remained inducible in 39 patients (70%) and spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias occurred more frequently in 4 patients (7%). Side effects prevented repeat testing in four patients. The 10 patients presenting with only ventricular fibrillation appeared to have a higher response rate: no ventricular tachyarrhythmias were inducible in 2 patients and sustained ventricular tachycardia was converted to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 2 patients. Despite protriptyline administration in 54 of 59 bethanidine trials, symptomatic hypotension occurred in 30 trials (51%). In conclusion, the efficacy of bethanidine for preventing ventricular tachyarrhythmias as assessed by programmed stimulation is low. Patients presenting with only ventricular fibrillation may have a more favorable response to bethanidine sulfate. Symptomatic hypotension occurs frequently despite concomitant use of protriptyline.

AB - Twelve cardiac electrophysiology centers conducted an open label prospective trial of bethanidine sulfate, an oral bretylium analog, for the prevention of ventricular trachyarrhythmias during programmed electrical stimulation. This study group included 56 patients (44 men, 12 women; mean age 60 years; 55 with structural heart disease). Sixteen patients had both ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, 30 had ventricular trachycardia alone and 10 had ventricular fibrillation alone. Programmed stimulation on no antiarrhythmic drugs induced sustained ventricular tachycardia in 46 patients, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 4 patients and ventricular fibrillation in 6 patients. During programmed ventricular stimulation after 59 trials of 20 to 30 mg/kg body weight of oral bethanidine (acute dosing in 40 patients, and divided dosing over 24 hours in 19 patients), no ventricular tachyarrhythmias were inducible in 6 patients (11%), sustained ventricular tachycardia was converted to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 3 patients (5%), ventricular tachyarrhythmias remained inducible in 39 patients (70%) and spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias occurred more frequently in 4 patients (7%). Side effects prevented repeat testing in four patients. The 10 patients presenting with only ventricular fibrillation appeared to have a higher response rate: no ventricular tachyarrhythmias were inducible in 2 patients and sustained ventricular tachycardia was converted to nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 2 patients. Despite protriptyline administration in 54 of 59 bethanidine trials, symptomatic hypotension occurred in 30 trials (51%). In conclusion, the efficacy of bethanidine for preventing ventricular tachyarrhythmias as assessed by programmed stimulation is low. Patients presenting with only ventricular fibrillation may have a more favorable response to bethanidine sulfate. Symptomatic hypotension occurs frequently despite concomitant use of protriptyline.

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