Best Practices in Medical Documentation: A Curricular Module

Megan E. McCabe, Richard Mink, David A. Turner, Donald L. Boyer, Mohammad Hossein Tcharmtchi, Jason Werner, James Schneider, Veronica Armijo-Garcia, Margaret Winkler, David Baker, Katherine E. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To create and validate a checklist for high-quality documentation and pilot a multi-modal, immersive educational module across multiple institutions. We hypothesized that this module would improve knowledge, skills, and attitudes in medical documentation. Methods: Module design was grounded in an established curriculum design framework. We conducted the study across 12 pediatric critical care fellowship programs between September 2017 and January 2018. Workshops were allotted 90 minutes for completion. We utilized a pre-/post- study design to determine the workshop's impact. Changes in knowledge were assessed through pre and post testing. Changes in skills were evaluated with a validated checklist for inclusion of key documentation elements. Changes in attitudes were determined through learner self-assessment Results: 83 of 138 eligible fellows (60%) started the module and 62 of 83 (75%) completed data sets for analysis. Immediate post-testing demonstrated modest statistically significant improvement in knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The workshop was easily disseminated and deployed Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a multi-modal educational intervention can lead to improvement in medical documentation knowledge, skills, and attitudes in a cohort of PCCM fellows and be easily disseminated for use by other specialties and types of clinicians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • communication skills
  • curriculum development
  • medical documentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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