Behavioral self-regulation and weight-related behaviors in inner-city adolescents: A model of direct and indirect effects

Carmen R. Isasi, Thomas A. Wills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: this study examined the association of two distinct self-regulation constructs, effortful control and dysregulation, with weight-related behaviors in adolescents and tested whether these effects were mediated by self-efficacy variables. Methods: A school-based survey was conducted with 1771 adolescents from 11 public schools in the bronx, New york. self-regulation was assessed by multiple indicators and defined as two latent constructs. Dependent variables included fruit/vegetable intake, intake of snack/junk food, frequency of physical activity, and time spent in sedentary behaviors. structural equation modeling examined the relation of effortful control and dysregulation to lifestyle behaviors, with self-efficacy variables as possible mediators. Results: study results showed that effortful control had a positive indirect effect on fruit and vegetable intake, mediated by selfefficacy, as well as a direct effect. effortful control also had a positive indirect effect on physical activity, mediated by self-efficacy. Dysregulation had direct effects on intake of junk food/snacks and time spent in sedentary behaviors. Conclusions: these findings indicate that self-regulation characteristics are related to diet and physical activity and that some of these effects are mediated by self-efficacy. Different effects were noted for the two domains of self-regulation. Prevention researchers should consider including self-regulation processes in programs to improve health behaviors in adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-315
Number of pages10
JournalChildhood Obesity
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Weights and Measures
Snacks
Exercise
Vegetables
Fruit
Adolescent Behavior
Health Behavior
Life Style
Eating
Research Personnel
Self-Control
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Behavioral self-regulation and weight-related behaviors in inner-city adolescents : A model of direct and indirect effects. / Isasi, Carmen R.; Wills, Thomas A.

In: Childhood Obesity, Vol. 7, No. 4, 08.2011, p. 306-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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