Barriers to adolescents' getting emergency contraception through pharmacy access in California

Differences by language and region

Olivia Sampson, Sandy K. Navarro, Amna Khan, Norman Hearst, Tina R. Raine, Marji Gold, Suellen Miller, Heike Thiel De Bocanegra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: In California, emergency contraception is available without a prescription to females younger than 18 through pharmacy access. Timely access to the method is critical to reduce the rate of unintended pregnancy among adolescents, particularly Latinas. Methods: In 2005-2006, researchers posing as English- and Spanish-speaking females - who said they either were 15 and had had unprotected intercourse last night or were 18 and had had unprotected sex four days ago - called 115 pharmacy-access pharmacies in California. Each pharmacy received one call using each scenario; a call was considered successful if the caller was told she could come in to obtain the method. Chi-square tests were used to assess differences between subgroups. In-depth interviews with 22 providers and pharmacists were also conducted, and emergent themes were identified. Results: Thirty-six percent of all calls were successful. Spanish speakers were less successful than English speakers (24% vs. 48%), and callers to rural pharmacies were less successful than callers to urban ones (27% vs. 44%). Although rural pharmacies were more likely to offer Spanish-language services, Spanish-speaking callers to these pharmacies were the least successful of all callers (17%). Spanish speakers were also less successful than English speakers when calling urban pharmacies (30% vs. 57%). Interviews suggested that little cooperation existed between pharmacists and clinicians and that dispensing the method at clinics was a favorable option for adolescents. Conclusions: Adolescents face significant barriers to obtaining emergency contraception, but the expansion of Spanish-language services at pharmacies and greater collaboration between providers and pharmacists could improve access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-118
Number of pages9
JournalPerspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

Fingerprint

Postcoital Contraception
Pharmacies
contraception
Language
adolescent
Pharmacists
language
pharmacist
Interviews
Unsafe Sex
Spanish language
Pregnancy in Adolescence
Pharmaceutical Services
Pregnancy Rate
Chi-Square Distribution
Hispanic Americans
speaking
Prescriptions
Research Personnel
interview

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Barriers to adolescents' getting emergency contraception through pharmacy access in California : Differences by language and region. / Sampson, Olivia; Navarro, Sandy K.; Khan, Amna; Hearst, Norman; Raine, Tina R.; Gold, Marji; Miller, Suellen; De Bocanegra, Heike Thiel.

In: Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, Vol. 41, No. 2, 06.2009, p. 110-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sampson, Olivia ; Navarro, Sandy K. ; Khan, Amna ; Hearst, Norman ; Raine, Tina R. ; Gold, Marji ; Miller, Suellen ; De Bocanegra, Heike Thiel. / Barriers to adolescents' getting emergency contraception through pharmacy access in California : Differences by language and region. In: Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health. 2009 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 110-118.
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