Barriers to adolescents' getting emergency contraception through pharmacy access in California: Differences by language and region

Olivia Sampson, Sandy K. Navarro, Amna Khan, Norman Hearst, Tina R. Raine, Marji Gold, Suellen Miller, Heike Thiel De Bocanegra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: In California, emergency contraception is available without a prescription to females younger than 18 through pharmacy access. Timely access to the method is critical to reduce the rate of unintended pregnancy among adolescents, particularly Latinas. Methods: In 2005-2006, researchers posing as English- and Spanish-speaking females - who said they either were 15 and had had unprotected intercourse last night or were 18 and had had unprotected sex four days ago - called 115 pharmacy-access pharmacies in California. Each pharmacy received one call using each scenario; a call was considered successful if the caller was told she could come in to obtain the method. Chi-square tests were used to assess differences between subgroups. In-depth interviews with 22 providers and pharmacists were also conducted, and emergent themes were identified. Results: Thirty-six percent of all calls were successful. Spanish speakers were less successful than English speakers (24% vs. 48%), and callers to rural pharmacies were less successful than callers to urban ones (27% vs. 44%). Although rural pharmacies were more likely to offer Spanish-language services, Spanish-speaking callers to these pharmacies were the least successful of all callers (17%). Spanish speakers were also less successful than English speakers when calling urban pharmacies (30% vs. 57%). Interviews suggested that little cooperation existed between pharmacists and clinicians and that dispensing the method at clinics was a favorable option for adolescents. Conclusions: Adolescents face significant barriers to obtaining emergency contraception, but the expansion of Spanish-language services at pharmacies and greater collaboration between providers and pharmacists could improve access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-118
Number of pages9
JournalPerspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

Fingerprint

Postcoital Contraception
Pharmacies
contraception
Language
adolescent
Pharmacists
language
pharmacist
Interviews
Unsafe Sex
Spanish language
Pregnancy in Adolescence
Pharmaceutical Services
Pregnancy Rate
Chi-Square Distribution
Hispanic Americans
speaking
Prescriptions
Research Personnel
interview

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Barriers to adolescents' getting emergency contraception through pharmacy access in California : Differences by language and region. / Sampson, Olivia; Navarro, Sandy K.; Khan, Amna; Hearst, Norman; Raine, Tina R.; Gold, Marji; Miller, Suellen; De Bocanegra, Heike Thiel.

In: Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, Vol. 41, No. 2, 06.2009, p. 110-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sampson, Olivia ; Navarro, Sandy K. ; Khan, Amna ; Hearst, Norman ; Raine, Tina R. ; Gold, Marji ; Miller, Suellen ; De Bocanegra, Heike Thiel. / Barriers to adolescents' getting emergency contraception through pharmacy access in California : Differences by language and region. In: Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health. 2009 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 110-118.
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