Bacterial bloodstream infections in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients before and after implementation of a central line-associated bloodstream infection protocol: A single-center experience

Alicia K. Chang, Marc D. Foca, Zhezhen Jin, Rahul Vasudev, Mary Laird, Sharon Schwartz, Mahvish Qureshi, Michelle Kolb, Anya Levinson, Monica Bhatia, Andrew Kung, James Garvin, Diane George, Phyllis Della-Latta, Susan Whittier, Lisa Saiman, Prakash Satwani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction There are only few reports describing the influence of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention strategies on the incidence of bacterial bloodstream infections (BBSIs). Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study among pediatric recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) to assess potential changes in BBSI rates during 3 time periods: pre-CLABSI prevention era (era 1, 2004-2005), CLABSI prevention implementation era (era 2, 2006-2009), and maintenance of CLABSI prevention era (era 3, 2010-2012). BBSI from day 0-365 following allo-HCT were studied. The comparison of person-years incidence rates among different periods was carried out by Poisson regression analysis. Results The mean age of patients was 10.0 years. During the study period, 126 (65%) of 190 patients had at least a single BBSI. From day 0-30, day 31-100, day 101-180, and day 181-365, 20%, 28%, 30%, and 17% of patients, respectively, experienced BBSIs. The rate of Staphylococcus epidermidis and gram-negative pathogens significantly declined from 3.16-0.93 and 6.32-2.21 per 100 person-months during era 1 and era 3, respectively (P = .001). Conclusions Patients undergoing allo-HCT during era 3 were associated with decreased risk of BBSI (P = .012). Maintenance of CLABSI protocols by nursing staff and appropriate education of other care providers is essential to lower incidence of BBSI in this high-risk population, and further strategies to decrease infection burden should be studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1650-1655
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume44
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bone marrow transplantation
  • Children
  • Sepsis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Bacterial bloodstream infections in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients before and after implementation of a central line-associated bloodstream infection protocol: A single-center experience'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this