Babesiosis in humans

A treatment review

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human infections with Babesia species, in particular Babesia microti, are tickborne illnesses that are being recognised with increased frequency. Coinfection with ehrlichiosis and Lyme disease is also being recognised as an important feature of these tick-borne illnesses. Despite the superficial resemblance of Babesia to malaria, these piroplasms do not respond to chloroquine or other similar drugs. However, the treatment of babesiosis using a clindamycin-quinine combination has been successful. Data in animal models and case-reports in humans have suggested that an atovaquone-azithromycin combination is also effective. This was confirmed in a recent prospective, open, randomised trial of clindamycin-quinine versus azithromycin-atovaquone. This paper reviews the literature on the treatment of human babesiosis and the animal models of these human pathogens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1109-1115
Number of pages7
JournalExpert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
Volume3
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Babesiosis
Atovaquone
Babesia
Azithromycin
Quinine
Clindamycin
Babesia microti
Animal Models
Ehrlichiosis
Lyme Disease
Chloroquine
Ticks
Coinfection
Malaria
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Atovaquone
  • Azithromycin
  • Babesia microti
  • Babesiosis
  • Clindamycin
  • Protozoa
  • Quinine
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Babesiosis in humans : A treatment review. / Weiss, Louis M.

In: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 3, No. 8, 2002, p. 1109-1115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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