Autophagy

In sickness and in health

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

606 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The degradation of intracellular components in lysosomes (autophagy) has recaptured the attention of cell biologists in recent years. The main reason for this renewed interest is the dissection of the molecular machinery that participates in this process, because the identification of new intracellular elements involved in autophagy has provided new tools to trace, quantify and manipulate autophagy in a growing number of organisms. As a result, a better understanding of the physiological roles of autophagy, the consequences of its malfunctioning and its participation in different pathological processes has emerged. This article reviews our current knowledge of the role of autophagy in disease and the efforts to reconcile its proposed dual function as both a cell protector and a cell killer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-77
Number of pages8
JournalTrends in Cell Biology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004

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Autophagy
Health
Pathologic Processes
Lysosomes
Dissection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Autophagy : In sickness and in health. / Cuervo, Ana Maria.

In: Trends in Cell Biology, Vol. 14, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 70-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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