Autophagy fights disease through cellular self-digestion

Noboru Mizushima, Beth Levine, Ana Maria Cuervo, Daniel J. Klionsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3895 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autophagy, or cellular self-digestion, is a cellular pathway involved in protein and organelle degradation, with an astonishing number of connections to human disease and physiology. For example, autophagic dysfunction is associated with cancer, neurodegeneration, microbial infection and ageing. Paradoxically, although autophagy is primarily a protective process for the cell, it can also play a role in cell death. Understanding autophagy may ultimately allow scientists and clinicians to harness this process for the purpose of improving human health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1069-1075
Number of pages7
JournalNature
Volume451
Issue number7182
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 28 2008

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Autophagy
Digestion
Organelles
Proteolysis
Cell Death
Health
Infection
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Mizushima, N., Levine, B., Cuervo, A. M., & Klionsky, D. J. (2008). Autophagy fights disease through cellular self-digestion. Nature, 451(7182), 1069-1075. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06639

Autophagy fights disease through cellular self-digestion. / Mizushima, Noboru; Levine, Beth; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Klionsky, Daniel J.

In: Nature, Vol. 451, No. 7182, 28.02.2008, p. 1069-1075.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mizushima, N, Levine, B, Cuervo, AM & Klionsky, DJ 2008, 'Autophagy fights disease through cellular self-digestion', Nature, vol. 451, no. 7182, pp. 1069-1075. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06639
Mizushima N, Levine B, Cuervo AM, Klionsky DJ. Autophagy fights disease through cellular self-digestion. Nature. 2008 Feb 28;451(7182):1069-1075. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature06639
Mizushima, Noboru ; Levine, Beth ; Cuervo, Ana Maria ; Klionsky, Daniel J. / Autophagy fights disease through cellular self-digestion. In: Nature. 2008 ; Vol. 451, No. 7182. pp. 1069-1075.
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