Atropa belladonna neurotoxicity: Implications to neurological disorders

Gunnar F. Kwakye, Jennifer Jiménez, Jessica A. Jiménez, Michael Aschner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Atropa belladonna, commonly known as belladonna or deadly nightshade, ranks among one of the most poisonous plants in Europe and other parts of the world. The plant contains tropane alkaloids including atropine, scopolamine, and hyoscyamine, which are used as anticholinergics in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs and homeopathic remedies. These alkaloids can be very toxic at high dose. The FDA has recently reported that Hyland's baby teething tablets contain inconsistent amounts of Atropa belladonna that may have adverse effects on the nervous system and cause death in children, thus recalled the product in 2017. A greater understanding of the neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna and its modification of genetic polymorphisms in the nervous system is critical in order to develop better treatment strategies, therapies, regulations, education of at-risk populations, and a more cohesive paradigm for future research. This review offers an integrated view of the homeopathy and neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna in children, adults, and animal models as well as its implications to neurological disorders. Particular attention is dedicated to the pharmaco/toxicodynamics, pharmaco/toxicokinetics, pathophysiology, epidemiological cases, and animal studies associated with the effects of Atropa belladonna on the nervous system. Additionally, we discuss the influence of active tropane alkaloids in Atropa belladonna and other similar plants on FDA-approved therapeutic drugs for treatment of neurological disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-353
Number of pages8
JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
Volume116
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Atropa belladonna
neurotoxicity
nervous system diseases
Neurology
Nervous System Diseases
Alkaloids
Tropanes
Animals
Hyoscyamine
Materia Medica
United States Food and Drug Administration
Scopolamine Hydrobromide
Nervous System
Poisons
nervous system
Cholinergic Antagonists
tropane alkaloids
Polymorphism
Atropine
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Atropa belladonna
  • Atropine
  • Deadly nightshade
  • Hyoscyamine
  • Neurological disorders
  • Neurotoxicity
  • Scopolamine
  • Teething drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Atropa belladonna neurotoxicity : Implications to neurological disorders. / Kwakye, Gunnar F.; Jiménez, Jennifer; Jiménez, Jessica A.; Aschner, Michael.

In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, Vol. 116, 01.06.2018, p. 346-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kwakye, Gunnar F. ; Jiménez, Jennifer ; Jiménez, Jessica A. ; Aschner, Michael. / Atropa belladonna neurotoxicity : Implications to neurological disorders. In: Food and Chemical Toxicology. 2018 ; Vol. 116. pp. 346-353.
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