Asthma risk factor assessment

What are the needs of inner-city families?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A complex array of risk factors contributes to sustained high levels of asthma morbidity in inner-city children. Objective: To describe risk factors for asthma morbidity in a national sample of inner-city children with persistent asthma. Methods: This study examined baseline questionnaire results from 1,772 children ages 5 to 11 years old with moderate to severe persistent asthma who enrolled in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded Inner-City Asthma Intervention between April 2001 and March 2004. Risk for asthma morbidity was assessed in 9 domains using the Child Asthma Risk Assessment Tool. The domains included environmental exposures, parental stress, medication adherence, pessimistic asthma beliefs, smoke exposure, aeroallergen exposure, child psychological well-being, responsibility for medication administration, and medical care. Results: A total of 51% of families demonstrated high risk of asthma morbidity in 3 or more domains. High risk of asthma morbidity was suggested based on household environmental exposures (47.7%), high parental stress (38.5%), poor medication adherence (38.3%), pessimistic asthma beliefs (31.8%), environmental tobacco smoke (24.4%), sensitization to aeroallergens in the home (24.8%), child behavioral or emotional concerns (22.9%), child assigned responsibility for medication administration (21.2%), and poor medical care (20.7%). Allergy testing was completed for 40% of the participating children. Of these children, 61% were exposed to aeroallergens in their home to which they were sensitized. Conclusions: In this national sample of inner-city children, multiple risk factors for asthma morbidity were identified. Asthma programs that provide multilevel support and intervention are needed to reduce the burden of asthma on inner-city families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume97
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Jul 2006

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Asthma
Morbidity
Medication Adherence
Environmental Exposure
Smoke
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Child Welfare
Tobacco
Hypersensitivity
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Asthma risk factor assessment : What are the needs of inner-city families? / Warman, Karen L.; Silver, Ellen J.; Wood, Pamela R.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 97, No. SUPPL. 1, 07.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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