Associations of sleep-disordered breathing and insomnia with incident hypertension and diabetes: The hispanic community health study/study of latinos

Xiaoyu Li, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Linda C. Gallo, Alberto R. Ramos, Larissa Aviles-Santa, Krista M. Perreira, Carmen R. Isasi, Phyllis C. Zee, Kimberly L. Savin, Neil Schneiderman, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Tamar Sofer, Martha Daviglus, Susan Redline

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rationale: Sleep disorders are associated with hypertension and diabetes, which are primary risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and mortality. It is important to understand these associations in Hispanic/Latino individuals, in whom cardiovascular death is the leading cause of mortality. Objectives: To investigate the prospective associations of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and insomnia with incident hypertension and diabetes among U.S. Hispanic/Latino people over 6 years of follow-up and to assess potential sex differences in these associations. Methods: Data from 11,623 Hispanic/Latino participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (visit 1, 2008–2011; visit 2, 2014–2017) were analyzed using survey logistic regression models, adjusting for potential confounders. Measurements and Main Results: SDB (apnea–hypopnea index of 5 or more) and insomnia (Women’s Health Initiative Insomnia Rating Scale of 9 or more) were measured at baseline. Incident hypertension (stage 2 or greater) and diabetes were defined according to national guidelines. In the target population, 52.6% were women, with a mean age of 41.1 6 14.9 years at baseline. SDB was associated with 1.54 higher adjusted odds of incident hypertension (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18–2.00) and 1.33 higher odds of incident diabetes (95% CI, 1.05–1.67) compared with no SDB. Insomnia was associated with incident hypertension (odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.11–1.69) but not with diabetes. The association between insomnia and incident hypertension was stronger among men than among women. Conclusions: SDB was associated with incident hypertension and diabetes. Insomnia was associated with incident hypertension. These findings support the importance of sleep disorders as modifiable targets for disease prevention and reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)356-365
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
Volume203
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2021

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Hispanic/Latino
  • Hypertension
  • Insomnia
  • Sleep-disordered breathing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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