Association of regional body composition with bone mineral density in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected momen: Women's interagency HIV study

Anjali Sharma, Fang Tian, Michael T. Yin, Marla J. Keller, Mardge Cohen, Phyllis C. Tien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To understand how regional body composition affects bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women. METHODS: Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure regional lean and fat mass and BMD at lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), and femoral neck (FN) in 318 HIV-infected and 122 HIV-uninfected Women's Interagency HIV Study participants at baseline and 2 and 5 years later. Total lean and fat mass were measured using bioimpedance analysis. Multivariate marginal linear regression models assessed the association of HIV status and body composition on BMD change. RESULTS: Compared with HIV-uninfected women, HIV-infected women were older (44 vs. 37 years), more likely to be Hepatitis C virus-infected (32% vs. 14%), and postmenopausal (26% vs. 3%) and had lower baseline total fat mass, trunk fat, and leg fat. In multivariate models, increased total lean mass was independently associated with increased BMD at LS, TH, and FN, and total fat mass was associated with increased BMD at TH and FN (all P < 0.05). When total fat was replaced in multivariate models with trunk fat and leg fat, increased trunk fat (and not leg fat) was associated with increased TH and FN BMD (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Total fat and lean mass are strong independent predictors of TH and FN BMD, and lean mass was associated with greater LS BMD. Regardless of HIV status, greater trunk fat (and not leg fat) was associated with increased TH and FN BMD, suggesting that weight-bearing fat may be a more important predictor of BMD in the hip.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-476
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

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Body Composition
Bone Density
Fats
HIV
Femur Neck
Hip
Leg
Spine
Linear Models
Weight-Bearing
Hepacivirus

Keywords

  • body composition
  • bone mineral density
  • fat redistribution
  • HIV
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Association of regional body composition with bone mineral density in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected momen : Women's interagency HIV study. / Sharma, Anjali; Tian, Fang; Yin, Michael T.; Keller, Marla J.; Cohen, Mardge; Tien, Phyllis C.

In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Vol. 61, No. 4, 01.12.2012, p. 469-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To understand how regional body composition affects bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women. METHODS: Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure regional lean and fat mass and BMD at lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), and femoral neck (FN) in 318 HIV-infected and 122 HIV-uninfected Women's Interagency HIV Study participants at baseline and 2 and 5 years later. Total lean and fat mass were measured using bioimpedance analysis. Multivariate marginal linear regression models assessed the association of HIV status and body composition on BMD change. RESULTS: Compared with HIV-uninfected women, HIV-infected women were older (44 vs. 37 years), more likely to be Hepatitis C virus-infected (32{\%} vs. 14{\%}), and postmenopausal (26{\%} vs. 3{\%}) and had lower baseline total fat mass, trunk fat, and leg fat. In multivariate models, increased total lean mass was independently associated with increased BMD at LS, TH, and FN, and total fat mass was associated with increased BMD at TH and FN (all P < 0.05). When total fat was replaced in multivariate models with trunk fat and leg fat, increased trunk fat (and not leg fat) was associated with increased TH and FN BMD (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Total fat and lean mass are strong independent predictors of TH and FN BMD, and lean mass was associated with greater LS BMD. Regardless of HIV status, greater trunk fat (and not leg fat) was associated with increased TH and FN BMD, suggesting that weight-bearing fat may be a more important predictor of BMD in the hip.",
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AB - OBJECTIVE: To understand how regional body composition affects bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women. METHODS: Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure regional lean and fat mass and BMD at lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), and femoral neck (FN) in 318 HIV-infected and 122 HIV-uninfected Women's Interagency HIV Study participants at baseline and 2 and 5 years later. Total lean and fat mass were measured using bioimpedance analysis. Multivariate marginal linear regression models assessed the association of HIV status and body composition on BMD change. RESULTS: Compared with HIV-uninfected women, HIV-infected women were older (44 vs. 37 years), more likely to be Hepatitis C virus-infected (32% vs. 14%), and postmenopausal (26% vs. 3%) and had lower baseline total fat mass, trunk fat, and leg fat. In multivariate models, increased total lean mass was independently associated with increased BMD at LS, TH, and FN, and total fat mass was associated with increased BMD at TH and FN (all P < 0.05). When total fat was replaced in multivariate models with trunk fat and leg fat, increased trunk fat (and not leg fat) was associated with increased TH and FN BMD (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Total fat and lean mass are strong independent predictors of TH and FN BMD, and lean mass was associated with greater LS BMD. Regardless of HIV status, greater trunk fat (and not leg fat) was associated with increased TH and FN BMD, suggesting that weight-bearing fat may be a more important predictor of BMD in the hip.

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