Association of food parenting practice patterns with obesogenic dietary intake in Hispanic/Latino youth: Results from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth)

Madison N. LeCroy, Anna Maria Siega-Riz, Sandra S. Albrecht, Dianne S. Ward, Jianwen Cai, Krista M. Perreira, Carmen R. Isasi, Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Linda C. Gallo, Sheila F. Castañeda, June Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Some food parenting practices (FPPs)are associated with obesogenic dietary intake in non-Hispanic youth, but studies in Hispanics/Latinos are limited. We examined how FPPs relate to obesogenic dietary intake using cross-sectional data from 1214 Hispanic/Latino 8-16-year-olds and their parents/caregivers in the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth). Diet was assessed with 2 24-h dietary recalls. Obesogenic items were snack foods, sweets, and high-sugar beverages. Three FPPs (Rules and Limits, Monitoring, and Pressure to Eat)derived from the Parenting strategies for Eating and Activity Scale (PEAS)were assessed. K-means cluster analysis identified 5 groups of parents with similar FPP scores. Survey-weighted multiple logistic regression examined associations of cluster membership with diet. Parents in the controlling (high scores for all FPPs)vs. indulgent (low scores for all FPPs)cluster had a 1.75 (95% CI: 1.02, 3.03)times higher odds of having children with high obesogenic dietary intake. Among parents of 12–16-year-olds, membership in the pressuring (high Pressure to Eat, low Rules and Limits and Monitoring scores)vs. indulgent cluster was associated with a 2.96 (95% CI: 1.51, 5.80)times greater odds of high obesogenic dietary intake. All other associations were null. Future longitudinal examinations of FPPs are needed to determine temporal associations with obesogenic dietary intake in Hispanic/Latino youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-287
Number of pages11
JournalAppetite
Volume140
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

Fingerprint

Parenting
Hispanic Americans
Food
Parents
Diet
Pressure
Snacks
Child Health
Beverages
Caregivers
Cluster Analysis
Eating
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Diet
  • Food parenting practices
  • Hispanic/Latino
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Association of food parenting practice patterns with obesogenic dietary intake in Hispanic/Latino youth : Results from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth). / LeCroy, Madison N.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Albrecht, Sandra S.; Ward, Dianne S.; Cai, Jianwen; Perreira, Krista M.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Gallo, Linda C.; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Stevens, June.

In: Appetite, Vol. 140, 01.09.2019, p. 277-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

LeCroy, Madison N. ; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria ; Albrecht, Sandra S. ; Ward, Dianne S. ; Cai, Jianwen ; Perreira, Krista M. ; Isasi, Carmen R. ; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin ; Gallo, Linda C. ; Castañeda, Sheila F. ; Stevens, June. / Association of food parenting practice patterns with obesogenic dietary intake in Hispanic/Latino youth : Results from the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth). In: Appetite. 2019 ; Vol. 140. pp. 277-287.
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