Association of ambient fine particles with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in New York city

Robert A. Silverman, Kazuhiko Ito, John Freese, Brad J. Kaufman, Danilynn De Claro, James Braun, David J. Prezant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cardiovascular morbidity has been associated with particulate matter (PM) air pollution, although the relation between pollutants and sudden death from cardiac arrest has not been established. This study examined associations between out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and fine PM (of aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm, or PM2.5), ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide in New York City. The authors analyzed 8,216 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of primary cardiac etiology during the years 2002-2006. Time-series and case-crossover analyses were conducted, controlling for season, day-of-week, same-day, and delayed/apparent temperature. An increased risk of cardiac arrest in time-series (relative risk (RR) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.10) and case-crossover (RR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.08) analysis for a PM2.5 increase of 10 μg/m3 in the average of 0-and 1-day lags was found. The association was significant in the warm season (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.15) but not the cold season (RR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.07). Associations of cardiac arrest with other pollutants were weaker. These findings, consistent with studies implicating acute cardiovascular effects of PM, support a link between PM2.5 and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Since few individuals survive an arrest, air pollution control may help prevent future cardiovascular mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-923
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume172
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • air pollution
  • death, sudden, cardiac
  • emergency medical services
  • particulate matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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