Association Between Molecular Subtypes of Colorectal Tumors and Patient Survival, Based on Pooled Analysis of 7 International Studies

Amanda I. Phipps, Elizabeth Alwers, Tabitha Harrison, Barbara Banbury, Hermann Brenner, Peter T. Campbell, Jenny Chang-Claude, Daniel Buchanan, Andrew T. Chan, Alton B. Farris, Jane C. Figueiredo, Steven Gallinger, Graham G. Giles, Mark Jenkins, Roger L. Milne, Polly A. Newcomb, Martha L. Slattery, Mingyang Song, Shuji Ogino, Syed H. ZaidiMichael Hoffmeister, Ulrike Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Aims: The heterogeneity among colorectal tumors is probably due to differences in developmental pathways and might associate with patient survival times. We studied the relationship among markers of different subtypes of colorectal tumors and patient survival. Methods: We pooled data from 7 observational studies, comprising 5010 patients with colorectal cancer. All the studies collected information on microsatellite instability (MSI), CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), and mutations in KRAS and BRAF in tumors. Tumors with complete marker data were classified as type 1 (MSI-high, CIMP-positive, with pathogenic mutations in BRAF but not KRAS), type 2 (not MSI-high, CIMP-positive, with pathogenic mutations in BRAF but not KRAS), type 3 (not MSI-high or CIMP, with pathogenic mutations in KRAS but not BRAF), type 4 (not MSI-high or CIMP, no pathogenic mutations in BRAF or KRAS), or type 5 (MSI-high, no CIMP, no pathogenic mutations in BRAF or KRAS). We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations of these subtypes and tumor markers with disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival times, adjusting for age, sex, stage at diagnosis, and study population. Results: Patients with type 2 colorectal tumors had significantly shorter time of DSS than patients with type 4 tumors (HRDSS 1.66; 95% CI 1.33–2.07), regardless of sex, age, or stage at diagnosis. Patients without MSI-high tumors had significantly shorter time of DSS compared with patients with MSI-high tumors (HRDSS 0.42; 95% CI 0.27–0.64), regardless of other tumor markers or stage, or patient sex or age. Conclusions: In a pooled analysis of data from 7 observational studies of patients with colorectal cancer, we found that tumor subtypes, defined by combinations of 4 common tumor markers, were associated with differences in survival time. Colorectal tumor subtypes might therefore be used in determining patients’ prognoses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2158-2168.e4
JournalGastroenterology
Volume158
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • CRC
  • Epigenetic
  • Genetics
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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