Assessment of long-term glycemia in type I diabetes using multiple blood glucose values stored in a memory-containing reflectometer

Harry Shamoon, Roger Mazze, Rosemarie Pasmantier, David Lucido, Jo Ann Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between repetitive hemoglobin A1 values and daily blood glucose tests performed by 20 insulin-dependent diabetic outpatients was assessed over a six-week period using a modified reflectance meter capable of storing blood glucose determinations automatically. An average of four and a half determinations per subject per day was recorded with a range of average blood glucose values between 82 ± 2 mg/dl and 316 ± 5 mg/dl (mean ± SE). The relationship between average blood glucose and hemoglobin A1 values was significant when hemoglobin A1 values at the end of the six-week period were correlated with the mean blood glucose level over that period (r = 0.55, p <0.02), but improved when a more remote hemoglobin A1 value obtained at 10 weeks was used (r = 0.64, p <0.005). Hemoglobin A1 values covering two-week intervals were extremely poor in reflecting average glycemia. The average fasting blood glucose level in these subjects was highly correlated with the overall daily blood glucose values (r = 0.89, p <0.0001), although the coefficients of variation of these parameters averaged 43 ± 3 percent and 47 ± 2 percent, respectively, and were greater than that of the hemoglobin A1 values over six weeks (10 ± 2 percent). It is concluded that labile blood glucose control in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes is accurately reflected by the average fasting blood glucose level, although multiple determinations must be employed. Satisfactory assessment may be made by use of hemoglobin A1 value provided that the hemoglobin A1 determination follows a sufficiently long period of time, presumably related to the turnover of glycosylated hemoglobin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1086-1092
Number of pages7
JournalThe American journal of medicine
Volume80
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Glucose
Hemoglobins
Fasting
Insulin
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Hematologic Tests
Outpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Assessment of long-term glycemia in type I diabetes using multiple blood glucose values stored in a memory-containing reflectometer. / Shamoon, Harry; Mazze, Roger; Pasmantier, Rosemarie; Lucido, David; Murphy, Jo Ann.

In: The American journal of medicine, Vol. 80, No. 6, 1986, p. 1086-1092.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shamoon, Harry ; Mazze, Roger ; Pasmantier, Rosemarie ; Lucido, David ; Murphy, Jo Ann. / Assessment of long-term glycemia in type I diabetes using multiple blood glucose values stored in a memory-containing reflectometer. In: The American journal of medicine. 1986 ; Vol. 80, No. 6. pp. 1086-1092.
@article{48ed5b7abfd3401eb3958fc95efbbe69,
title = "Assessment of long-term glycemia in type I diabetes using multiple blood glucose values stored in a memory-containing reflectometer",
abstract = "The relationship between repetitive hemoglobin A1 values and daily blood glucose tests performed by 20 insulin-dependent diabetic outpatients was assessed over a six-week period using a modified reflectance meter capable of storing blood glucose determinations automatically. An average of four and a half determinations per subject per day was recorded with a range of average blood glucose values between 82 ± 2 mg/dl and 316 ± 5 mg/dl (mean ± SE). The relationship between average blood glucose and hemoglobin A1 values was significant when hemoglobin A1 values at the end of the six-week period were correlated with the mean blood glucose level over that period (r = 0.55, p <0.02), but improved when a more remote hemoglobin A1 value obtained at 10 weeks was used (r = 0.64, p <0.005). Hemoglobin A1 values covering two-week intervals were extremely poor in reflecting average glycemia. The average fasting blood glucose level in these subjects was highly correlated with the overall daily blood glucose values (r = 0.89, p <0.0001), although the coefficients of variation of these parameters averaged 43 ± 3 percent and 47 ± 2 percent, respectively, and were greater than that of the hemoglobin A1 values over six weeks (10 ± 2 percent). It is concluded that labile blood glucose control in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes is accurately reflected by the average fasting blood glucose level, although multiple determinations must be employed. Satisfactory assessment may be made by use of hemoglobin A1 value provided that the hemoglobin A1 determination follows a sufficiently long period of time, presumably related to the turnover of glycosylated hemoglobin.",
author = "Harry Shamoon and Roger Mazze and Rosemarie Pasmantier and David Lucido and Murphy, {Jo Ann}",
year = "1986",
doi = "10.1016/0002-9343(86)90669-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "80",
pages = "1086--1092",
journal = "American Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0002-9343",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessment of long-term glycemia in type I diabetes using multiple blood glucose values stored in a memory-containing reflectometer

AU - Shamoon, Harry

AU - Mazze, Roger

AU - Pasmantier, Rosemarie

AU - Lucido, David

AU - Murphy, Jo Ann

PY - 1986

Y1 - 1986

N2 - The relationship between repetitive hemoglobin A1 values and daily blood glucose tests performed by 20 insulin-dependent diabetic outpatients was assessed over a six-week period using a modified reflectance meter capable of storing blood glucose determinations automatically. An average of four and a half determinations per subject per day was recorded with a range of average blood glucose values between 82 ± 2 mg/dl and 316 ± 5 mg/dl (mean ± SE). The relationship between average blood glucose and hemoglobin A1 values was significant when hemoglobin A1 values at the end of the six-week period were correlated with the mean blood glucose level over that period (r = 0.55, p <0.02), but improved when a more remote hemoglobin A1 value obtained at 10 weeks was used (r = 0.64, p <0.005). Hemoglobin A1 values covering two-week intervals were extremely poor in reflecting average glycemia. The average fasting blood glucose level in these subjects was highly correlated with the overall daily blood glucose values (r = 0.89, p <0.0001), although the coefficients of variation of these parameters averaged 43 ± 3 percent and 47 ± 2 percent, respectively, and were greater than that of the hemoglobin A1 values over six weeks (10 ± 2 percent). It is concluded that labile blood glucose control in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes is accurately reflected by the average fasting blood glucose level, although multiple determinations must be employed. Satisfactory assessment may be made by use of hemoglobin A1 value provided that the hemoglobin A1 determination follows a sufficiently long period of time, presumably related to the turnover of glycosylated hemoglobin.

AB - The relationship between repetitive hemoglobin A1 values and daily blood glucose tests performed by 20 insulin-dependent diabetic outpatients was assessed over a six-week period using a modified reflectance meter capable of storing blood glucose determinations automatically. An average of four and a half determinations per subject per day was recorded with a range of average blood glucose values between 82 ± 2 mg/dl and 316 ± 5 mg/dl (mean ± SE). The relationship between average blood glucose and hemoglobin A1 values was significant when hemoglobin A1 values at the end of the six-week period were correlated with the mean blood glucose level over that period (r = 0.55, p <0.02), but improved when a more remote hemoglobin A1 value obtained at 10 weeks was used (r = 0.64, p <0.005). Hemoglobin A1 values covering two-week intervals were extremely poor in reflecting average glycemia. The average fasting blood glucose level in these subjects was highly correlated with the overall daily blood glucose values (r = 0.89, p <0.0001), although the coefficients of variation of these parameters averaged 43 ± 3 percent and 47 ± 2 percent, respectively, and were greater than that of the hemoglobin A1 values over six weeks (10 ± 2 percent). It is concluded that labile blood glucose control in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes is accurately reflected by the average fasting blood glucose level, although multiple determinations must be employed. Satisfactory assessment may be made by use of hemoglobin A1 value provided that the hemoglobin A1 determination follows a sufficiently long period of time, presumably related to the turnover of glycosylated hemoglobin.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022728930&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022728930&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0002-9343(86)90669-8

DO - 10.1016/0002-9343(86)90669-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 3728505

AN - SCOPUS:0022728930

VL - 80

SP - 1086

EP - 1092

JO - American Journal of Medicine

JF - American Journal of Medicine

SN - 0002-9343

IS - 6

ER -