Assessing the association of depression and anxiety with symptom reporting among individuals with type 2 diabetes

Arielle G. Asman, Claire J. Hoogendoorn, Melissa D. McKee, Jeffrey S. Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Depression and anxiety have been linked to increased somatic symptoms among individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but their independent effects and role in symptom attributions remain unclear. This study examined depression and anxiety in relation to total symptoms and symptom attributions in a diverse sample of 120 adults with T2D. Multiple linear regression tested associations after controlling for medical comorbidities and insulin use. Clinician-rated depression (β =.53, p <.001), self-reported depression (β =.59, p <.001) and self-reported anxiety (β =.62, p <.001) were positively associated with total somatic symptoms. Models adjusting for depression and anxiety revealed significant independent effects for each, regardless of measurement method. In attribution models, only self-reported depression (β =.27, p =.003) was significantly associated with greater attribution to diabetes, whereas clinician-rated depression (β =.19, p =.047), self-reported depression (β =.38, p <.001) and anxiety (β =.28, p =.004) were associated with increased attribution to medications. In models adjusting for depression and anxiety, self-reported depression was a significant independent predictor of diabetes (β =.29, p =.023) and medication (β =.38, p =.004) attribution; anxiety was a significant predictor of medication attribution (β =.25, p =.039). Findings suggest depression and anxiety are implicated in overall increases in somatic symptom complaints and an increased tendency to attribute these symptoms to diabetes and side-effects of diabetes medications among adults with T2D.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Anxiety
Depression
Comorbidity
Linear Models
Insulin

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Signs and symptoms
  • Type 2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Assessing the association of depression and anxiety with symptom reporting among individuals with type 2 diabetes. / Asman, Arielle G.; Hoogendoorn, Claire J.; McKee, Melissa D.; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Asman, Arielle G. ; Hoogendoorn, Claire J. ; McKee, Melissa D. ; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S. / Assessing the association of depression and anxiety with symptom reporting among individuals with type 2 diabetes. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2019.
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