Asians and Asian Subgroups are Underrepresented in Medical Research Studies Published in High-Impact Generalist Journals

Hong An T. Nguyen, Amy Zheng, Abigail Gugel, Caroline J. Kistin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Including diverse participants in biomedical research is essential to reduce health disparities. We assessed the inclusion of Asians in original research studies conducted in North America and published from 2015-2016 in six high-impact generalist journals: New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), JAMAInternal Medicine, JAMA Pediatrics, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Pediatrics. We determined race reporting method, participant percentage, and reporting of outcomes or implications of findings for Asians and Asian subgroups. Of 1077 studies, 263 articles (24.4%) identified Asians as a distinct race/ethnicity; the median percentage of Asians per study was 3.8%. Of the 263 articles, 28 (10.6%) studies reported outcomes for Asians; nine (3.4%) articles included information about Asian subgroups. Asians are underrepresented in high-impact medical research studies in North America. Efforts to improve study enrollment, data collection, and reporting of findings of Asians in studies remain essential to improve health outcomes for this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)646-649
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Asian American
  • Data collection
  • Disaggregation
  • Research methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Asians and Asian Subgroups are Underrepresented in Medical Research Studies Published in High-Impact Generalist Journals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this