Application of Community-Based Participatory Research Methods to a Study of Complementary Medicine Interventions at End of Life

Anna Leila Williams, Peter A. Selwyn, Ruth Mccorkle, Susan Molde, Lauren Liberti, David L. Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles can be successfully applied to the design and implementation of a complementary medicine study for adults with end-stage AIDS. The Yale Prevention Research Center partnered with Leeway, Inc., an AIDS-dedicated nursing facility, and other academic and clinical entities to conduct a randomized, controlled pilot trial of meditation and massage on quality of life at the end of life. Using CBPR principles, a methodology was developed that was scientifically rigorous, highly respectful, and acceptable to the 91% minority study population. Using continuous, open communication among all involved parties, challenges were satisfactorily addressed in a timely manner. Fifty-eight residents (97% of those eligible) with end-stage AIDS participated from November 2001 to September 2003. Subjects received 1-month interventions of meditation, massage, combined meditation and massage, or standard care. The study of quality-of-life in end-stage AIDS poses unique challenges well met by applying CBPR principles to an academic-community research partnership.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-104
Number of pages14
JournalComplementary Health Practice Review
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Community-Based Participatory Research
Complementary Therapies
Meditation
Massage
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Quality of Life
Research
Nursing
Randomized Controlled Trials
Communication
Population

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • community-based participatory research
  • end of life
  • massage
  • meditation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Application of Community-Based Participatory Research Methods to a Study of Complementary Medicine Interventions at End of Life. / Williams, Anna Leila; Selwyn, Peter A.; Mccorkle, Ruth; Molde, Susan; Liberti, Lauren; Katz, David L.

In: Complementary Health Practice Review, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2005, p. 91-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, Anna Leila ; Selwyn, Peter A. ; Mccorkle, Ruth ; Molde, Susan ; Liberti, Lauren ; Katz, David L. / Application of Community-Based Participatory Research Methods to a Study of Complementary Medicine Interventions at End of Life. In: Complementary Health Practice Review. 2005 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 91-104.
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