Antiretroviral resistance mutations among pregnant human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected women and their newborns in the United States

Vertical transmission and clades

Perinatal AIDS Collaborative Transmission Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess the impact of antiretroviral resistance on perinatal transmission prevention efforts, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genotypic resistance testing was done for 220 HIV-1-infected, zidovudine (AZT) - exposed pregnant women and 24 of their infected infants. The women were prospectively enrolled in 4 US cities in 1991-1997. Phylogenetic and sequencing analyses revealed 5 women with non-clade B infections traced to western African origins. AZT-associated mutations were detected in 17.3% of pregnant women, whereas genotypic resistance to nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors was infrequent. No significant association was detected between perinatal transmission and the presence of either AZT or nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor resistance-associated mutations. AZT resistance mutations were detected in 2 (8.3%) neonatal samples, but the mutation pattern was not identical to the mother's. Although no effect of viral resistance on mother-infant transmission was demonstrated, the advent of more-potent drug classes and the potential for the rapid emergence of resistance warrant prospective surveillance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1120-1126
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume184
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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HIV-1
Newborn Infant
Mutation
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors
Pregnant Women
Mothers
Zidovudine
Protease Inhibitors
Nucleosides
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Antiretroviral resistance mutations among pregnant human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected women and their newborns in the United States : Vertical transmission and clades. / Perinatal AIDS Collaborative Transmission Study.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 184, No. 9, 2001, p. 1120-1126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "To assess the impact of antiretroviral resistance on perinatal transmission prevention efforts, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genotypic resistance testing was done for 220 HIV-1-infected, zidovudine (AZT) - exposed pregnant women and 24 of their infected infants. The women were prospectively enrolled in 4 US cities in 1991-1997. Phylogenetic and sequencing analyses revealed 5 women with non-clade B infections traced to western African origins. AZT-associated mutations were detected in 17.3{\%} of pregnant women, whereas genotypic resistance to nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors was infrequent. No significant association was detected between perinatal transmission and the presence of either AZT or nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor resistance-associated mutations. AZT resistance mutations were detected in 2 (8.3{\%}) neonatal samples, but the mutation pattern was not identical to the mother's. Although no effect of viral resistance on mother-infant transmission was demonstrated, the advent of more-potent drug classes and the potential for the rapid emergence of resistance warrant prospective surveillance.",
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