Antigen-specific immunotherapy for murine lung metastatic tumors expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein

Hongxiu Ji, Edwin Y. Chang, Ken Yu Lin, Robert J. Kurman, Drew M. Pardoll, T. C. Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

An important goal of cancer immunotherapy is to prevent and treat tumor metastasis. We have previously reported a recombinant vaccinia-based vaccine (Sig/E7/LAMP-I) that demonstrated significant anti-tumor effect in a subcutaneous tumor challenge model. In this study, we investigated the potency of the Sig/E7/LAMP-I vaccine in preventing and treating metastatic tumors. A tumor metastasis model was generated by injecting human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6/E7 expressing tumor cells, designated TC- 1, into the tail vein of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. All the naive mice injected with 1 x 106 TC-I cells developed tumors confined exclusively to the lungs within 1 month. For in vivo tumor prevention experiments, mice were vaccinated with Sig/E7/LAMP-I followed by tumor challenge. While tumor growth was observed in all of the mice (10/10) in the control groups, 8 of 10 vaccinated mice (80%) remained tumor-free 2 months post-tumor challenge. For in vivo treatment experiments, mice were first inoculated with TC-I cells and then vaccinated with Sig/E7/LAMP-I. Treatment with Sig/E7/LAMP-I was effective in eliminating preexisting tumor cells in 4 of 5 vaccinated mice. Most importantly, treatment with Sig/E7/LAMP-I resulted in regression of fully established lung tumors in 50% (5/10) of vaccinated mice. Our data suggest that the Sig/E7/LAMP-I vaccine is effective in controlling the hematogenous spread of TC-I tumor cells. In addition, the TC-I lung metastasis model can be used to test the efficacy of various E6/E7-specific vaccines and immunotherapeutic strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-45
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Human papillomavirus 16
Oncogene Proteins
Immunotherapy
Antigens
Lung
Neoplasms
Vaccines
Neoplasm Metastasis
Vaccinia
Inbred C57BL Mouse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Antigen-specific immunotherapy for murine lung metastatic tumors expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein. / Ji, Hongxiu; Chang, Edwin Y.; Lin, Ken Yu; Kurman, Robert J.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Wu, T. C.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 78, No. 1, 03.09.1998, p. 41-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ji, Hongxiu ; Chang, Edwin Y. ; Lin, Ken Yu ; Kurman, Robert J. ; Pardoll, Drew M. ; Wu, T. C. / Antigen-specific immunotherapy for murine lung metastatic tumors expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein. In: International Journal of Cancer. 1998 ; Vol. 78, No. 1. pp. 41-45.
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