Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of impulsivity and aggression and impulse control and cluster B personality disorders

Heather A. Berlin, Eric Hollander

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

We review here evidence that suggest that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (a.k.a. anticonvulsants) may be effective for the treatment of impulsivity and aggression across a range of psychiatric disorders. AEDs are increasingly used as primary or adjunctive treatments for impulse control disorders (ICDs) and cluster B personality disorders [in particular borderline personality disorder (BPD)]. Thus, in addition to the reviewing the effects of AEDS on the symptoms of impulsivity and aggression across a variety of diagnoses, we will focus on ICDs and BPD. The AEDs valproate (e.g., divalproex sodium), carbamazepine, and lamotrigine have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indications for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Other AEDs, like oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, phenytoin, and tiagabine, are often used as mood stabilizers but do not have FDA indication for bipolar disorder. Use of off-label AEDs requires careful monitoring and publication of all significant results, including adverse effects. The choice of specific AED is often dependent on drug-drug interactions and side-effect profile (1). Side effects from AEDs are typically mild to moderate. Although data regarding longerterm safety of the newer AEDs are limited, they may have more desirable side-effect profiles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAntiepileptic Drugs to Treat Psychiatric Disorders
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages311-341
Number of pages31
ISBN (Electronic)9780849382666
ISBN (Print)0849382599, 9780849382598
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Impulsive Behavior
Personality Disorders
Aggression
Anticonvulsants
Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders
Borderline Personality Disorder
etiracetam
Therapeutics
Valproic Acid
United States Food and Drug Administration
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Bipolar Disorder
Off-Label Use
Carbamazepine
Phenytoin
Drug Interactions
Psychiatry
Publications
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of impulsivity and aggression and impulse control and cluster B personality disorders. / Berlin, Heather A.; Hollander, Eric.

Antiepileptic Drugs to Treat Psychiatric Disorders. Taylor and Francis, 2008. p. 311-341.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Berlin, Heather A. ; Hollander, Eric. / Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of impulsivity and aggression and impulse control and cluster B personality disorders. Antiepileptic Drugs to Treat Psychiatric Disorders. Taylor and Francis, 2008. pp. 311-341
@inbook{58bf9b26a48f45538d3938d4b796bc66,
title = "Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of impulsivity and aggression and impulse control and cluster B personality disorders",
abstract = "We review here evidence that suggest that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (a.k.a. anticonvulsants) may be effective for the treatment of impulsivity and aggression across a range of psychiatric disorders. AEDs are increasingly used as primary or adjunctive treatments for impulse control disorders (ICDs) and cluster B personality disorders [in particular borderline personality disorder (BPD)]. Thus, in addition to the reviewing the effects of AEDS on the symptoms of impulsivity and aggression across a variety of diagnoses, we will focus on ICDs and BPD. The AEDs valproate (e.g., divalproex sodium), carbamazepine, and lamotrigine have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indications for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Other AEDs, like oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, phenytoin, and tiagabine, are often used as mood stabilizers but do not have FDA indication for bipolar disorder. Use of off-label AEDs requires careful monitoring and publication of all significant results, including adverse effects. The choice of specific AED is often dependent on drug-drug interactions and side-effect profile (1). Side effects from AEDs are typically mild to moderate. Although data regarding longerterm safety of the newer AEDs are limited, they may have more desirable side-effect profiles.",
author = "Berlin, {Heather A.} and Eric Hollander",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3109/9780849382666-20",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0849382599",
pages = "311--341",
booktitle = "Antiepileptic Drugs to Treat Psychiatric Disorders",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of impulsivity and aggression and impulse control and cluster B personality disorders

AU - Berlin, Heather A.

AU - Hollander, Eric

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - We review here evidence that suggest that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (a.k.a. anticonvulsants) may be effective for the treatment of impulsivity and aggression across a range of psychiatric disorders. AEDs are increasingly used as primary or adjunctive treatments for impulse control disorders (ICDs) and cluster B personality disorders [in particular borderline personality disorder (BPD)]. Thus, in addition to the reviewing the effects of AEDS on the symptoms of impulsivity and aggression across a variety of diagnoses, we will focus on ICDs and BPD. The AEDs valproate (e.g., divalproex sodium), carbamazepine, and lamotrigine have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indications for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Other AEDs, like oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, phenytoin, and tiagabine, are often used as mood stabilizers but do not have FDA indication for bipolar disorder. Use of off-label AEDs requires careful monitoring and publication of all significant results, including adverse effects. The choice of specific AED is often dependent on drug-drug interactions and side-effect profile (1). Side effects from AEDs are typically mild to moderate. Although data regarding longerterm safety of the newer AEDs are limited, they may have more desirable side-effect profiles.

AB - We review here evidence that suggest that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (a.k.a. anticonvulsants) may be effective for the treatment of impulsivity and aggression across a range of psychiatric disorders. AEDs are increasingly used as primary or adjunctive treatments for impulse control disorders (ICDs) and cluster B personality disorders [in particular borderline personality disorder (BPD)]. Thus, in addition to the reviewing the effects of AEDS on the symptoms of impulsivity and aggression across a variety of diagnoses, we will focus on ICDs and BPD. The AEDs valproate (e.g., divalproex sodium), carbamazepine, and lamotrigine have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indications for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Other AEDs, like oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, phenytoin, and tiagabine, are often used as mood stabilizers but do not have FDA indication for bipolar disorder. Use of off-label AEDs requires careful monitoring and publication of all significant results, including adverse effects. The choice of specific AED is often dependent on drug-drug interactions and side-effect profile (1). Side effects from AEDs are typically mild to moderate. Although data regarding longerterm safety of the newer AEDs are limited, they may have more desirable side-effect profiles.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076654243&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85076654243&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/9780849382666-20

DO - 10.3109/9780849382666-20

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85076654243

SN - 0849382599

SN - 9780849382598

SP - 311

EP - 341

BT - Antiepileptic Drugs to Treat Psychiatric Disorders

PB - Taylor and Francis

ER -