Anti-colony-stimulating factor-1 antibody staining in primary breast adenocarcinomas correlates with marked inflammatory cell infiltrates and prognosis

S. M. Scholl, C. Pallud, F. Beuvon, K. Hacene, E. R. Stanley, L. Rohrschneider, R. Tang, P. Pouillart, R. Lidereau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Clinical studies have shown that a marked lymphoplasmocytic reaction in breast tumors is associated with poor prognosis. Such findings raise the possibility that an inflammatory cell reaction might be a tumor- induced response that tends to promote tumor growth. Purpose: We assessed the expression of colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) as well as the prevalence of specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and monocytes in breast tumors. Methods: Tissue sections were obtained from archival paraffin blocks from 196 breast cancer patients. Seventy-eight percent of the women had been treated by mastectomy and 22% by lumpectomy. Median age of the patients was 54 years, and median follow-up was 7.3 years. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques were used to characterize the specimens. Results: Markedly high numbers of CD45RO-positive T- and L26-positive B-cell infiltrates were found in 13% and 17% of the tissue specimens, respectively. CSF-1 receptor-positive monocytes were detected in 48% and CD68-positive monocytes in 90% of the tumors. In turn, tumors with large fractions of CD68- positive monocytes also showed CSF-1 receptor-positive monocytes (P<.0001). CSF-1 was expressed significantly in 74% of the tumors and the CSF-1 receptor in more than 50% of the tumors. Tumors with high percentages of CSF-1 expressing cells also had marked monocyte infiltrates (P = .035). The presence of marked CD45RO-positive T-cell infiltrates and apparent nuclear staining of CSF-1 in tumor cells were associated with the more frequent occurrence of metastases (P = .02 and P = .04, respectively) and with poor survival (P = .02 and P = .03, respectively). Conclusions: Large numbers of CD45RO-positive (activated memory but noncytotoxic) T cells as well as a predominant nuclear staining pattern for CSF-1 are associated with a poor outcome in breast cancer patients. Implications: Nuclear retention of CSF-1 could reflect CSF-1 turnover and function in tumor cells, but new approaches are needed to establish the significance of these observations. Secreted CSF- 1 appears to cause monocyte recruitment and activation thereby modulating immune functions and potentially the expression of the CD45RO phenotype in T cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-126
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume86
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 19 1994

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Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Prognosis
Antibody
Antibodies
Correlate
Monocytes
Tumors
Tumor
Adenocarcinoma
Breast
Staining and Labeling
Cell
Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptors
Neoplasms
T-cells
Receptor
Breast Neoplasms
Cells
T-Lymphocytes
Breast Cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Scholl, S. M., Pallud, C., Beuvon, F., Hacene, K., Stanley, E. R., Rohrschneider, L., ... Lidereau, R. (1994). Anti-colony-stimulating factor-1 antibody staining in primary breast adenocarcinomas correlates with marked inflammatory cell infiltrates and prognosis. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 86(2), 120-126.

Anti-colony-stimulating factor-1 antibody staining in primary breast adenocarcinomas correlates with marked inflammatory cell infiltrates and prognosis. / Scholl, S. M.; Pallud, C.; Beuvon, F.; Hacene, K.; Stanley, E. R.; Rohrschneider, L.; Tang, R.; Pouillart, P.; Lidereau, R.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 86, No. 2, 19.01.1994, p. 120-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scholl, SM, Pallud, C, Beuvon, F, Hacene, K, Stanley, ER, Rohrschneider, L, Tang, R, Pouillart, P & Lidereau, R 1994, 'Anti-colony-stimulating factor-1 antibody staining in primary breast adenocarcinomas correlates with marked inflammatory cell infiltrates and prognosis', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 86, no. 2, pp. 120-126.
Scholl, S. M. ; Pallud, C. ; Beuvon, F. ; Hacene, K. ; Stanley, E. R. ; Rohrschneider, L. ; Tang, R. ; Pouillart, P. ; Lidereau, R. / Anti-colony-stimulating factor-1 antibody staining in primary breast adenocarcinomas correlates with marked inflammatory cell infiltrates and prognosis. In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1994 ; Vol. 86, No. 2. pp. 120-126.
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title = "Anti-colony-stimulating factor-1 antibody staining in primary breast adenocarcinomas correlates with marked inflammatory cell infiltrates and prognosis",
abstract = "Background: Clinical studies have shown that a marked lymphoplasmocytic reaction in breast tumors is associated with poor prognosis. Such findings raise the possibility that an inflammatory cell reaction might be a tumor- induced response that tends to promote tumor growth. Purpose: We assessed the expression of colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) as well as the prevalence of specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and monocytes in breast tumors. Methods: Tissue sections were obtained from archival paraffin blocks from 196 breast cancer patients. Seventy-eight percent of the women had been treated by mastectomy and 22{\%} by lumpectomy. Median age of the patients was 54 years, and median follow-up was 7.3 years. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques were used to characterize the specimens. Results: Markedly high numbers of CD45RO-positive T- and L26-positive B-cell infiltrates were found in 13{\%} and 17{\%} of the tissue specimens, respectively. CSF-1 receptor-positive monocytes were detected in 48{\%} and CD68-positive monocytes in 90{\%} of the tumors. In turn, tumors with large fractions of CD68- positive monocytes also showed CSF-1 receptor-positive monocytes (P<.0001). CSF-1 was expressed significantly in 74{\%} of the tumors and the CSF-1 receptor in more than 50{\%} of the tumors. Tumors with high percentages of CSF-1 expressing cells also had marked monocyte infiltrates (P = .035). The presence of marked CD45RO-positive T-cell infiltrates and apparent nuclear staining of CSF-1 in tumor cells were associated with the more frequent occurrence of metastases (P = .02 and P = .04, respectively) and with poor survival (P = .02 and P = .03, respectively). Conclusions: Large numbers of CD45RO-positive (activated memory but noncytotoxic) T cells as well as a predominant nuclear staining pattern for CSF-1 are associated with a poor outcome in breast cancer patients. Implications: Nuclear retention of CSF-1 could reflect CSF-1 turnover and function in tumor cells, but new approaches are needed to establish the significance of these observations. Secreted CSF- 1 appears to cause monocyte recruitment and activation thereby modulating immune functions and potentially the expression of the CD45RO phenotype in T cells.",
author = "Scholl, {S. M.} and C. Pallud and F. Beuvon and K. Hacene and Stanley, {E. R.} and L. Rohrschneider and R. Tang and P. Pouillart and R. Lidereau",
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T1 - Anti-colony-stimulating factor-1 antibody staining in primary breast adenocarcinomas correlates with marked inflammatory cell infiltrates and prognosis

AU - Scholl, S. M.

AU - Pallud, C.

AU - Beuvon, F.

AU - Hacene, K.

AU - Stanley, E. R.

AU - Rohrschneider, L.

AU - Tang, R.

AU - Pouillart, P.

AU - Lidereau, R.

PY - 1994/1/19

Y1 - 1994/1/19

N2 - Background: Clinical studies have shown that a marked lymphoplasmocytic reaction in breast tumors is associated with poor prognosis. Such findings raise the possibility that an inflammatory cell reaction might be a tumor- induced response that tends to promote tumor growth. Purpose: We assessed the expression of colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) as well as the prevalence of specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and monocytes in breast tumors. Methods: Tissue sections were obtained from archival paraffin blocks from 196 breast cancer patients. Seventy-eight percent of the women had been treated by mastectomy and 22% by lumpectomy. Median age of the patients was 54 years, and median follow-up was 7.3 years. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques were used to characterize the specimens. Results: Markedly high numbers of CD45RO-positive T- and L26-positive B-cell infiltrates were found in 13% and 17% of the tissue specimens, respectively. CSF-1 receptor-positive monocytes were detected in 48% and CD68-positive monocytes in 90% of the tumors. In turn, tumors with large fractions of CD68- positive monocytes also showed CSF-1 receptor-positive monocytes (P<.0001). CSF-1 was expressed significantly in 74% of the tumors and the CSF-1 receptor in more than 50% of the tumors. Tumors with high percentages of CSF-1 expressing cells also had marked monocyte infiltrates (P = .035). The presence of marked CD45RO-positive T-cell infiltrates and apparent nuclear staining of CSF-1 in tumor cells were associated with the more frequent occurrence of metastases (P = .02 and P = .04, respectively) and with poor survival (P = .02 and P = .03, respectively). Conclusions: Large numbers of CD45RO-positive (activated memory but noncytotoxic) T cells as well as a predominant nuclear staining pattern for CSF-1 are associated with a poor outcome in breast cancer patients. Implications: Nuclear retention of CSF-1 could reflect CSF-1 turnover and function in tumor cells, but new approaches are needed to establish the significance of these observations. Secreted CSF- 1 appears to cause monocyte recruitment and activation thereby modulating immune functions and potentially the expression of the CD45RO phenotype in T cells.

AB - Background: Clinical studies have shown that a marked lymphoplasmocytic reaction in breast tumors is associated with poor prognosis. Such findings raise the possibility that an inflammatory cell reaction might be a tumor- induced response that tends to promote tumor growth. Purpose: We assessed the expression of colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) as well as the prevalence of specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and monocytes in breast tumors. Methods: Tissue sections were obtained from archival paraffin blocks from 196 breast cancer patients. Seventy-eight percent of the women had been treated by mastectomy and 22% by lumpectomy. Median age of the patients was 54 years, and median follow-up was 7.3 years. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques were used to characterize the specimens. Results: Markedly high numbers of CD45RO-positive T- and L26-positive B-cell infiltrates were found in 13% and 17% of the tissue specimens, respectively. CSF-1 receptor-positive monocytes were detected in 48% and CD68-positive monocytes in 90% of the tumors. In turn, tumors with large fractions of CD68- positive monocytes also showed CSF-1 receptor-positive monocytes (P<.0001). CSF-1 was expressed significantly in 74% of the tumors and the CSF-1 receptor in more than 50% of the tumors. Tumors with high percentages of CSF-1 expressing cells also had marked monocyte infiltrates (P = .035). The presence of marked CD45RO-positive T-cell infiltrates and apparent nuclear staining of CSF-1 in tumor cells were associated with the more frequent occurrence of metastases (P = .02 and P = .04, respectively) and with poor survival (P = .02 and P = .03, respectively). Conclusions: Large numbers of CD45RO-positive (activated memory but noncytotoxic) T cells as well as a predominant nuclear staining pattern for CSF-1 are associated with a poor outcome in breast cancer patients. Implications: Nuclear retention of CSF-1 could reflect CSF-1 turnover and function in tumor cells, but new approaches are needed to establish the significance of these observations. Secreted CSF- 1 appears to cause monocyte recruitment and activation thereby modulating immune functions and potentially the expression of the CD45RO phenotype in T cells.

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