Ancient papillomavirus-host co-speciation in Felidae

Annabel Rector, Philippe Lemey, Ruth Tachezy, Sara Mostmans, Shin Je Ghim, Koenraad Van Doorslaer, Melody Roelke, Mitchell Bush, Richard J. Montali, Janis Joslin, Robert D. Burk, Alfred B. Jenson, John P. Sundberg, Beth Shapiro, Marc Van Ranst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Estimating evolutionary rates for slowly evolving viruses such as papillomaviruses (PVs) is not possible using fossil calibrations directly or sequences sampled over a time-scale of decades. An ability to correlate their divergence with a host species, however, can provide a means to estimate evolutionary rates for these viruses accurately. To determine whether such an approach is feasible, we sequenced complete feline PV genomes, previously available only for the domestic cat (Felis domesticus, FdPV1), from four additional, globally distributed feline species: Lynx rufus PV type 1, Puma concolor PV type 1, Panthera leo persica PV type 1, and Uncia uncia PV type 1. Results: The feline PVs all belong to the Lambdapapillomavirus genus, and contain an unusual second noncoding region between the early and late protein region, which is only present in members of this genus. Our maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that the evolutionary relationships between feline PVs perfectly mirror those of their feline hosts, despite a complex and dynamic phylogeographic history. By applying host species divergence times, we provide the first precise estimates for the rate of evolution for each PV gene, with an overall evolutionary rate of 1.95 × 10-8 (95% confidence interval 1.32 × 10-8 to 2.47 × 10-8) nucleotide substitutions per site per year for the viral coding genome. Conclusion: Our work provides evidence for long-term virus-host co-speciation of feline PVs, indicating that viral diversity in slowly evolving viruses can be used to investigate host species evolution. These findings, however, should not be extrapolated to other viral lineages without prior confirmation of virus-host co-divergence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberR57
JournalGenome Biology
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 12 2007

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Feline papillomavirus
Felidae
Papillomaviridae
virus
viruses
Viruses
divergence
cats
Lambdapapillomavirus
genome
Panthera uncia
Cats
Lynx rufus
Lynx
Puma
Puma concolor
Felis
Lions
Bayes Theorem
Viral Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Rector, A., Lemey, P., Tachezy, R., Mostmans, S., Ghim, S. J., Van Doorslaer, K., ... Van Ranst, M. (2007). Ancient papillomavirus-host co-speciation in Felidae. Genome Biology, 8(4), [R57]. https://doi.org/10.1186/gb-2007-8-4-r57

Ancient papillomavirus-host co-speciation in Felidae. / Rector, Annabel; Lemey, Philippe; Tachezy, Ruth; Mostmans, Sara; Ghim, Shin Je; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Roelke, Melody; Bush, Mitchell; Montali, Richard J.; Joslin, Janis; Burk, Robert D.; Jenson, Alfred B.; Sundberg, John P.; Shapiro, Beth; Van Ranst, Marc.

In: Genome Biology, Vol. 8, No. 4, R57, 12.04.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rector, A, Lemey, P, Tachezy, R, Mostmans, S, Ghim, SJ, Van Doorslaer, K, Roelke, M, Bush, M, Montali, RJ, Joslin, J, Burk, RD, Jenson, AB, Sundberg, JP, Shapiro, B & Van Ranst, M 2007, 'Ancient papillomavirus-host co-speciation in Felidae', Genome Biology, vol. 8, no. 4, R57. https://doi.org/10.1186/gb-2007-8-4-r57
Rector A, Lemey P, Tachezy R, Mostmans S, Ghim SJ, Van Doorslaer K et al. Ancient papillomavirus-host co-speciation in Felidae. Genome Biology. 2007 Apr 12;8(4). R57. https://doi.org/10.1186/gb-2007-8-4-r57
Rector, Annabel ; Lemey, Philippe ; Tachezy, Ruth ; Mostmans, Sara ; Ghim, Shin Je ; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad ; Roelke, Melody ; Bush, Mitchell ; Montali, Richard J. ; Joslin, Janis ; Burk, Robert D. ; Jenson, Alfred B. ; Sundberg, John P. ; Shapiro, Beth ; Van Ranst, Marc. / Ancient papillomavirus-host co-speciation in Felidae. In: Genome Biology. 2007 ; Vol. 8, No. 4.
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