An Atypical Mechanism of Split Intein Molecular Recognition and Folding

Adam J. Stevens, Giridhar Sekar, Josef A. Gramespacher, David Cowburn, Tom W. Muir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Split inteins associate to trigger protein splicing in trans, a post-translational modification in which protein sequences fused to the intein pair are ligated together in a traceless manner. Recently, a family of naturally split inteins has been identified that is split at a noncanonical location in the primary sequence. These atypically split inteins show considerable promise in protein engineering applications; however, the mechanism by which they associate is unclear and must be different from that of previously characterized canonically split inteins due to unique topological restrictions. Here, we use a consensus design strategy to generate an atypical split intein pair (Cat) that has greatly improved activity and is amenable to detailed biochemical and biophysical analysis. Guided by the solution structure of Cat, we show that the association of the fragments involves a disorder-to-order structural transition driven by hydrophobic interactions. This molecular recognition mechanism satisfies the topological constraints of the intein fold and, importantly, ensures that premature chemistry does not occur prior to fragment complementation. Our data lead a common blueprint for split intein complementation in which localized structural rearrangements are used to drive folding and regulate protein-splicing activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11791-11799
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume140
Issue number37
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 19 2018

Fingerprint

Inteins
Molecular recognition
Proteins
Protein Splicing
Blueprints
Cats
Association reactions
Protein Engineering
Post Translational Protein Processing
Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

An Atypical Mechanism of Split Intein Molecular Recognition and Folding. / Stevens, Adam J.; Sekar, Giridhar; Gramespacher, Josef A.; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 140, No. 37, 19.09.2018, p. 11791-11799.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stevens, Adam J. ; Sekar, Giridhar ; Gramespacher, Josef A. ; Cowburn, David ; Muir, Tom W. / An Atypical Mechanism of Split Intein Molecular Recognition and Folding. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2018 ; Vol. 140, No. 37. pp. 11791-11799.
@article{1dcdcf6e0a064cbc9258ccd598c6b76b,
title = "An Atypical Mechanism of Split Intein Molecular Recognition and Folding",
abstract = "Split inteins associate to trigger protein splicing in trans, a post-translational modification in which protein sequences fused to the intein pair are ligated together in a traceless manner. Recently, a family of naturally split inteins has been identified that is split at a noncanonical location in the primary sequence. These atypically split inteins show considerable promise in protein engineering applications; however, the mechanism by which they associate is unclear and must be different from that of previously characterized canonically split inteins due to unique topological restrictions. Here, we use a consensus design strategy to generate an atypical split intein pair (Cat) that has greatly improved activity and is amenable to detailed biochemical and biophysical analysis. Guided by the solution structure of Cat, we show that the association of the fragments involves a disorder-to-order structural transition driven by hydrophobic interactions. This molecular recognition mechanism satisfies the topological constraints of the intein fold and, importantly, ensures that premature chemistry does not occur prior to fragment complementation. Our data lead a common blueprint for split intein complementation in which localized structural rearrangements are used to drive folding and regulate protein-splicing activity.",
author = "Stevens, {Adam J.} and Giridhar Sekar and Gramespacher, {Josef A.} and David Cowburn and Muir, {Tom W.}",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1021/jacs.8b07334",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "140",
pages = "11791--11799",
journal = "Journal of the American Chemical Society",
issn = "0002-7863",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "37",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An Atypical Mechanism of Split Intein Molecular Recognition and Folding

AU - Stevens, Adam J.

AU - Sekar, Giridhar

AU - Gramespacher, Josef A.

AU - Cowburn, David

AU - Muir, Tom W.

PY - 2018/9/19

Y1 - 2018/9/19

N2 - Split inteins associate to trigger protein splicing in trans, a post-translational modification in which protein sequences fused to the intein pair are ligated together in a traceless manner. Recently, a family of naturally split inteins has been identified that is split at a noncanonical location in the primary sequence. These atypically split inteins show considerable promise in protein engineering applications; however, the mechanism by which they associate is unclear and must be different from that of previously characterized canonically split inteins due to unique topological restrictions. Here, we use a consensus design strategy to generate an atypical split intein pair (Cat) that has greatly improved activity and is amenable to detailed biochemical and biophysical analysis. Guided by the solution structure of Cat, we show that the association of the fragments involves a disorder-to-order structural transition driven by hydrophobic interactions. This molecular recognition mechanism satisfies the topological constraints of the intein fold and, importantly, ensures that premature chemistry does not occur prior to fragment complementation. Our data lead a common blueprint for split intein complementation in which localized structural rearrangements are used to drive folding and regulate protein-splicing activity.

AB - Split inteins associate to trigger protein splicing in trans, a post-translational modification in which protein sequences fused to the intein pair are ligated together in a traceless manner. Recently, a family of naturally split inteins has been identified that is split at a noncanonical location in the primary sequence. These atypically split inteins show considerable promise in protein engineering applications; however, the mechanism by which they associate is unclear and must be different from that of previously characterized canonically split inteins due to unique topological restrictions. Here, we use a consensus design strategy to generate an atypical split intein pair (Cat) that has greatly improved activity and is amenable to detailed biochemical and biophysical analysis. Guided by the solution structure of Cat, we show that the association of the fragments involves a disorder-to-order structural transition driven by hydrophobic interactions. This molecular recognition mechanism satisfies the topological constraints of the intein fold and, importantly, ensures that premature chemistry does not occur prior to fragment complementation. Our data lead a common blueprint for split intein complementation in which localized structural rearrangements are used to drive folding and regulate protein-splicing activity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053185704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053185704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/jacs.8b07334

DO - 10.1021/jacs.8b07334

M3 - Article

C2 - 30156841

AN - SCOPUS:85053185704

VL - 140

SP - 11791

EP - 11799

JO - Journal of the American Chemical Society

JF - Journal of the American Chemical Society

SN - 0002-7863

IS - 37

ER -