Allergic fungal sinusitis in the pediatric population

Stephen B. Kupferberg, John P. Bent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the optimal treatment in pediatric patients with allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS). Design: A retrospective review of 10 patients diagnosed as having AFS. Setting: Academic tertiary medical center. Patients: Pediatric patients who fulfilled 5 criteria necessary for diagnosis of AFS: (1) type 1 hypersensitivity; (2) nasal polyposis; (3) characteristic computed tomographic scan; (4) histological evidence of eosinophilic mucus without evidence of fungal invasion into sinus tissue; and (5) a positive fungal stain or culture of sinus contents. Treatment: All patients were treated with functional endoscopic sinus surgery with removal of fungal debris. Adjuvant therapy included nasal irrigations, postoperative endoscopic cleanings, and systemic corticosteroids in 9 of 10 patients. Mean Outcome Measure: Clinical disease monitored endoscopically by means of an objective staging system. Results: Five patients were without disease (stage 0), 1 had allergic mucin and mucosal edema (stage 1), 1 had allergic mucin and polypoid edema (stage II), and 3 had polyps and/or fungal debris (stage III). Conclusions: The treatment and prognosis of pediatric AFS are similar to those of adult AFS. However, systemic corticosteroids should be weaned aggressively in children to minimize complications, particularly long-term growth retardation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1381-1384
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume122
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sinusitis
Pediatrics
Population
Mucins
Edema
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Nasal Lavage
Immediate Hypersensitivity
Mucus
Therapeutics
Polyps
Nose
Coloring Agents
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Allergic fungal sinusitis in the pediatric population. / Kupferberg, Stephen B.; Bent, John P.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 122, No. 12, 12.1996, p. 1381-1384.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f9adfe564bd44218a64886eed58454d0,
title = "Allergic fungal sinusitis in the pediatric population",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the optimal treatment in pediatric patients with allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS). Design: A retrospective review of 10 patients diagnosed as having AFS. Setting: Academic tertiary medical center. Patients: Pediatric patients who fulfilled 5 criteria necessary for diagnosis of AFS: (1) type 1 hypersensitivity; (2) nasal polyposis; (3) characteristic computed tomographic scan; (4) histological evidence of eosinophilic mucus without evidence of fungal invasion into sinus tissue; and (5) a positive fungal stain or culture of sinus contents. Treatment: All patients were treated with functional endoscopic sinus surgery with removal of fungal debris. Adjuvant therapy included nasal irrigations, postoperative endoscopic cleanings, and systemic corticosteroids in 9 of 10 patients. Mean Outcome Measure: Clinical disease monitored endoscopically by means of an objective staging system. Results: Five patients were without disease (stage 0), 1 had allergic mucin and mucosal edema (stage 1), 1 had allergic mucin and polypoid edema (stage II), and 3 had polyps and/or fungal debris (stage III). Conclusions: The treatment and prognosis of pediatric AFS are similar to those of adult AFS. However, systemic corticosteroids should be weaned aggressively in children to minimize complications, particularly long-term growth retardation.",
author = "Kupferberg, {Stephen B.} and Bent, {John P.}",
year = "1996",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "122",
pages = "1381--1384",
journal = "Archives of Otolaryngology",
issn = "2168-6181",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Allergic fungal sinusitis in the pediatric population

AU - Kupferberg, Stephen B.

AU - Bent, John P.

PY - 1996/12

Y1 - 1996/12

N2 - Objective: To determine the optimal treatment in pediatric patients with allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS). Design: A retrospective review of 10 patients diagnosed as having AFS. Setting: Academic tertiary medical center. Patients: Pediatric patients who fulfilled 5 criteria necessary for diagnosis of AFS: (1) type 1 hypersensitivity; (2) nasal polyposis; (3) characteristic computed tomographic scan; (4) histological evidence of eosinophilic mucus without evidence of fungal invasion into sinus tissue; and (5) a positive fungal stain or culture of sinus contents. Treatment: All patients were treated with functional endoscopic sinus surgery with removal of fungal debris. Adjuvant therapy included nasal irrigations, postoperative endoscopic cleanings, and systemic corticosteroids in 9 of 10 patients. Mean Outcome Measure: Clinical disease monitored endoscopically by means of an objective staging system. Results: Five patients were without disease (stage 0), 1 had allergic mucin and mucosal edema (stage 1), 1 had allergic mucin and polypoid edema (stage II), and 3 had polyps and/or fungal debris (stage III). Conclusions: The treatment and prognosis of pediatric AFS are similar to those of adult AFS. However, systemic corticosteroids should be weaned aggressively in children to minimize complications, particularly long-term growth retardation.

AB - Objective: To determine the optimal treatment in pediatric patients with allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS). Design: A retrospective review of 10 patients diagnosed as having AFS. Setting: Academic tertiary medical center. Patients: Pediatric patients who fulfilled 5 criteria necessary for diagnosis of AFS: (1) type 1 hypersensitivity; (2) nasal polyposis; (3) characteristic computed tomographic scan; (4) histological evidence of eosinophilic mucus without evidence of fungal invasion into sinus tissue; and (5) a positive fungal stain or culture of sinus contents. Treatment: All patients were treated with functional endoscopic sinus surgery with removal of fungal debris. Adjuvant therapy included nasal irrigations, postoperative endoscopic cleanings, and systemic corticosteroids in 9 of 10 patients. Mean Outcome Measure: Clinical disease monitored endoscopically by means of an objective staging system. Results: Five patients were without disease (stage 0), 1 had allergic mucin and mucosal edema (stage 1), 1 had allergic mucin and polypoid edema (stage II), and 3 had polyps and/or fungal debris (stage III). Conclusions: The treatment and prognosis of pediatric AFS are similar to those of adult AFS. However, systemic corticosteroids should be weaned aggressively in children to minimize complications, particularly long-term growth retardation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029906202&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029906202&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8956755

AN - SCOPUS:0029906202

VL - 122

SP - 1381

EP - 1384

JO - Archives of Otolaryngology

JF - Archives of Otolaryngology

SN - 2168-6181

IS - 12

ER -