Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis treated successfully for one year with omalizumab

Jennifer Collins, Gabriele de Vos, Golda Hudes, David L. Rosenstreich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Current therapy for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) uses oral corticosteroids, exposing patients to the adverse effects of these agents. There are reports of the steroid-sparing effect of anti-IgE therapy with omalizumab for ABPA in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), but there is little information on its efficacy against ABPA in patients with bronchial asthma without CF. Objective: To examine the effects of omalizumab, measured by asthma control, blood eosinophilia, total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), oral corticosteroid requirements, and forced expiratory volume spirometry in patients with ABPA and bronchial asthma. Methods: A retrospective review of charts from 2004-2006 of patients treated with omalizumab at an academic allergy and immunology practice in the Bronx, New York were examined for systemic steroid and rescue inhaler usage, serum immunoglobulin E levels, blood eosinophil counts, and asthma symptoms, as measured by the Asthma Control Test (ACT). Results: A total of 21 charts were screened for the diagnosis of ABPA and bronchial asthma. Four patients with ABPA were identified; two of these patients were male. The median monthly systemic corticosteroid use at 6 months and 12 months decreased from baseline usage. Total serum IgE decreased in all patients at 12 months of therapy. Pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory vital capacity at one second (FEV1) was variable at 1 year of treatment. There was an improvement in Asthma Control Test (ACT) symptom scores for both daytime and nighttime symptoms. Conclusions: Treatment with omalizumab creates a steroid-sparing effect, reduces systemic inflammatory markers, and results in improvement in ACT scores in patients with ABPA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-70
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Asthma and Allergy
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis
Asthma
Immunoglobulin E
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Steroids
Cystic Fibrosis
Serum
Omalizumab
Passive Immunization
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Bronchodilator Agents
Spirometry
Vital Capacity
Forced Expiratory Volume
Eosinophilia
Therapeutics
Allergy and Immunology
Eosinophils

Keywords

  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis
  • Asthma
  • Omalizumab

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis treated successfully for one year with omalizumab. / Collins, Jennifer; de Vos, Gabriele; Hudes, Golda; Rosenstreich, David L.

In: Journal of Asthma and Allergy, No. 5, 2012, p. 65-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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