Alcohol use, acculturation and socioeconomic status among Hispanic/Latino men and women

The Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos

Sheila F. Castañeda, Melawhy L. Garcia, Maria Lopez-Gurrola, Mark Stoutenberg, Kristen Emory, Martha L. Daviglus, Robert C. Kaplan, Aida L. Giachello, Kristine M. Molina, Krista M. Perreira, Marston E. Youngblood, Denise C. Vidot, Gregory A. Talavera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and patterns of alcohol use among U.S. Hispanic/Latino adults of diverse backgrounds. The population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/ Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) enrolled a cohort of Hispanic/ Latino adults (N = 16,415) ages 18–74 years at time of recruitment, from four US metropolitan areas between 2008–11. Drinking patterns and socio-demographics questionnaires were administered as part of the baseline examination. The relationship between age, sex, socio-demographics, acculturation, current alcohol use, and alcohol risk disorder, defined by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) [no risk (i.e., never drinker), low risk (i.e., women<7 drinks/week; men<14 drinks/week), and at-risk (i.e., women>7 drinks/week; men>14 drinks/week)] were assessed in unadjusted and adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses. Men reported a higher prevalence than women of at-risk drinking. For women, increased odds of at-risk alcohol use was associated with: a younger age, greater education, full-time employment, and acculturation after adjustment. For men, having a lower income (vs. higher income) or a higher income (vs. not reported) and being employed fulltime (vs. retired) was associated with at-risk alcohol use. For both men and women, there were variations in odds of at-risk drinking across Hispanic/Latino heritage backgrounds, after adjustment. Exact values, odds ratios and p-values are reported within the text. Common factors across sex associated with at-risk drinking included being of Mexican background and being employed full-time. Intervention strategies should consider diversity within the Hispanic/Latino community when designing alcohol abuse prevention programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0214906
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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acculturation
community health
Acculturation
socioeconomic status
Hispanic Americans
Social Class
alcohols
Alcohols
Health
drinking
alcohol abuse
Drinking
income
Social Adjustment
abuse prevention
demographic statistics
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (U.S.)
Demography
gender
Sex Factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Castañeda, S. F., Garcia, M. L., Lopez-Gurrola, M., Stoutenberg, M., Emory, K., Daviglus, M. L., ... Talavera, G. A. (2019). Alcohol use, acculturation and socioeconomic status among Hispanic/Latino men and women: The Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos. PLoS ONE, 14(4), [e0214906]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0214906

Alcohol use, acculturation and socioeconomic status among Hispanic/Latino men and women : The Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos. / Castañeda, Sheila F.; Garcia, Melawhy L.; Lopez-Gurrola, Maria; Stoutenberg, Mark; Emory, Kristen; Daviglus, Martha L.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Giachello, Aida L.; Molina, Kristine M.; Perreira, Krista M.; Youngblood, Marston E.; Vidot, Denise C.; Talavera, Gregory A.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 14, No. 4, e0214906, 01.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castañeda, SF, Garcia, ML, Lopez-Gurrola, M, Stoutenberg, M, Emory, K, Daviglus, ML, Kaplan, RC, Giachello, AL, Molina, KM, Perreira, KM, Youngblood, ME, Vidot, DC & Talavera, GA 2019, 'Alcohol use, acculturation and socioeconomic status among Hispanic/Latino men and women: The Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos', PLoS ONE, vol. 14, no. 4, e0214906. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0214906
Castañeda, Sheila F. ; Garcia, Melawhy L. ; Lopez-Gurrola, Maria ; Stoutenberg, Mark ; Emory, Kristen ; Daviglus, Martha L. ; Kaplan, Robert C. ; Giachello, Aida L. ; Molina, Kristine M. ; Perreira, Krista M. ; Youngblood, Marston E. ; Vidot, Denise C. ; Talavera, Gregory A. / Alcohol use, acculturation and socioeconomic status among Hispanic/Latino men and women : The Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos. In: PLoS ONE. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 4.
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