Agreement between obstructive airways disease diagnoses from self-report questionnaires and medical records

Jessica Weakley, Mayris P. Webber, Fen Ye, Rachel Zeig-Owens, Hillel W. Cohen, Charles B. Hall, Kerry Kelly, David J. Prezant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate agreement between self-reported obstructive airways disease (OAD) diagnoses of asthma, bronchitis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema obtained from the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) monitoring questionnaires with physician diagnoses from FDNY medical records. Method: We measured sensitivity, specificity, and agreement between self-report and physician OAD diagnoses in FDNY members enrolled in the World Trade Center (WTC) monitoring program who completed a questionnaire between 8/2005-1/2012. Using logistic models, we identified characteristics of those who self-report a physician diagnosis that is also reported by FDNY physicians. Results: 20.3% of the study population (N =14,615) self-reported OAD, while 15.1% received FDNY physician OAD diagnoses. Self-reported asthma had the highest sensitivity (68.7%) and overall agreement (91.9%) between sources. Non-asthma OAD had the lowest sensitivity (32.1%). Multivariate analyses showed that among those with an OAD diagnosis from FDNY medical records, inhaler use (OR =4.90, 95% CI =3.84-6.26) and respiratory symptoms (OR =1.55 [95% CI =1.25-1.92]-1.77 [95% CI =1.37-2.27]) were associated with self-reported OAD diagnoses. Conclusion: Among participants in the WTC monitoring program, sensitivity for self-reported OAD diagnoses ranges from good to poor and improves by considering inhaler use. These findings highlight the need for improved patient communication and education, especially for bronchitis or COPD/emphysema.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

Self Report
Medical Records
Physicians
Pulmonary Emphysema
Bronchitis
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Asthma
Surveys and Questionnaires
Patient Education
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Communication
Sensitivity and Specificity
Population

Keywords

  • Obstructive airways disease (OAD)
  • Population study
  • Self-reported diagnoses
  • Sensitivity/specificity/agreement
  • World Trade Center (WTC)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Agreement between obstructive airways disease diagnoses from self-report questionnaires and medical records. / Weakley, Jessica; Webber, Mayris P.; Ye, Fen; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Cohen, Hillel W.; Hall, Charles B.; Kelly, Kerry; Prezant, David J.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 57, No. 1, 07.2013, p. 38-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weakley, Jessica ; Webber, Mayris P. ; Ye, Fen ; Zeig-Owens, Rachel ; Cohen, Hillel W. ; Hall, Charles B. ; Kelly, Kerry ; Prezant, David J. / Agreement between obstructive airways disease diagnoses from self-report questionnaires and medical records. In: Preventive Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 57, No. 1. pp. 38-42.
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