Age of first cancer diagnosis and survival in Bloom syndrome

Thelma Alessandra Sugrañes, Maeve Flanagan, Charlene Thomas, Vivian Y. Chang, Michael Walsh, Christopher Cunniff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to describe the spectrum of cancers observed in Bloom Syndrome and the observed survival and age of first cancer diagnosis in Bloom syndrome as these are not well-defined. Methods: Data from the Bloom Syndrome Registry (BSR) was used for this study. Cancer history, ages of first cancer diagnosis, and ages of death were compiled from the BSR and analyzed. Results: Among the 290 individuals in the BSR, 155 (53%) participants developed 251 malignant neoplasms; 100 (65%) were diagnosed with 1 malignancy, whereas the remaining 55 (35%) developed multiple malignancies. Of the 251 neoplasms, 83 (33%) were hematologic and 168 (67%) were solid tumors. Hematologic malignancies (leukemia and lymphoma) were more common than any of the solid tumors. The most commonly observed solid tumors were colorectal, breast, and oropharyngeal. The cumulative incidence of any malignancy by age 40 was 83%. The median survival for all participants in the BSR was 36.2 years. There were no significant differences in time to first cancer diagnosis or survival by genotype among the study participants. Conclusion: We describe the spectrum of cancers observed in Bloom syndrome and the observed survival and age of first cancer diagnosis in Bloom syndrome. We also highlight the significant differences in survival and age of diagnosis seen among different tumor types and genotypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1476-1484
Number of pages9
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bloom syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Diagnosis
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

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