Adverse events in cancer patients with sickle cell trait or disease

Case reports

Helen Swede, Biree Andemariam, David I. Gregorio, Beth A. Jones, Dejana Braithwaite, Thomas E. Rohan, Richard G. Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Given the relatively high prevalence of sickle cell trait and disease among African Americans and established racial disparities in cancer outcomes, we reviewed the literature regarding adverse events in cancer patients with these hematologic genotypes. Erythrocyte sickling can result from extreme hypoxia and other physiologic stressors, as might occur during cancer therapy. Further, tumoral hypoxia, a poor prognostic and predictive factor, could lead to a cycle of local sickling and increased hypoxia. Methods: A search of PubMed produced 150 publications, most of which were excluded because of incidental relevance. Eleven case reports of patients diagnosed from 1993 to 2013 were reviewed. Results: Two reports of patients with sickle cell trait describe an abundance of sickled erythrocytes within tumors, and a third report describes sickling-related events requiring multiday hospitalization. Eight reports of patients with sickle cell disease delineated multiorgan failure, vaso-occlusive crises, and rapid renal deterioration. Hypothesized triggers are delayed clearance of anticancer agents attributable to baseline kidney damage, activation of vasoadherent neutrophils from treatment to counter chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, hypoxia from general anesthesia, and intratumoral hypoxia. Conclusion: Clinical implications include pretreatment genotyping for prophylaxis, dose adjustment, and enhanced patient monitoring. With the current lack of high-quality evidence, however, the scope of poor outcomes remains unknown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-241
Number of pages5
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Fingerprint

Sickle Cell Trait
Sickle Cell Anemia
Neoplasms
Erythrocytes
Kidney
Neutrophil Activation
Physiologic Monitoring
Neutropenia
PubMed
African Americans
Antineoplastic Agents
General Anesthesia
Publications
Hospitalization
Genotype
Hypoxia
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • cancer
  • cancer adverse effects
  • disparities
  • hypoxia
  • sickle cell disease
  • sickle cell trait

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Swede, H., Andemariam, B., Gregorio, D. I., Jones, B. A., Braithwaite, D., Rohan, T. E., & Stevens, R. G. (2015). Adverse events in cancer patients with sickle cell trait or disease: Case reports. Genetics in Medicine, 17(3), 237-241. https://doi.org/10.1038/gim.2014.105

Adverse events in cancer patients with sickle cell trait or disease : Case reports. / Swede, Helen; Andemariam, Biree; Gregorio, David I.; Jones, Beth A.; Braithwaite, Dejana; Rohan, Thomas E.; Stevens, Richard G.

In: Genetics in Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.03.2015, p. 237-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Swede, H, Andemariam, B, Gregorio, DI, Jones, BA, Braithwaite, D, Rohan, TE & Stevens, RG 2015, 'Adverse events in cancer patients with sickle cell trait or disease: Case reports', Genetics in Medicine, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 237-241. https://doi.org/10.1038/gim.2014.105
Swede, Helen ; Andemariam, Biree ; Gregorio, David I. ; Jones, Beth A. ; Braithwaite, Dejana ; Rohan, Thomas E. ; Stevens, Richard G. / Adverse events in cancer patients with sickle cell trait or disease : Case reports. In: Genetics in Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 237-241.
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