Adolescent pathways to adult smoking: Ethnic identity, peer substance use, and antisocial behavior

Judith S. Brook, Chenshu Zhang, Stephen J. Finch, David W. Brook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

African-Americans and Puerto Ricans were interviewed during adolescence, in their early twenties, and then again in their mid-twenties. Results indicated that earlier adolescent smoking, family conflict, and weak ethnic identity were significantly related to antisocial behavior, which in turn was related to associating with friends who smoked and/or used illegal drugs, and ultimately, to their own smoking. Results further indicate that early interventions in the development of tobacco use should focus on decreasing parental and adolescent smoking and parent-child conflict. If intervention occurs at a later time point, the emphasis should be on increasing ethnic identity and decreasing antisocial behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-186
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Adolescent pathways to adult smoking: Ethnic identity, peer substance use, and antisocial behavior'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this