Adolescent medicine

Attitudes, training, and experience of pediatric, family medicine, and obstetric-gynecology residents

Rebecca Kershnar, Charlene Hooper, Marji Gold, Errol R. Norwitz, Jessica L. Illuzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Several studies have documented a deficiency in the delivery of preventive services to adolescents during physician visits in the United States. This study sought to assess and compare pediatric, family medicine (FM†), and obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) resident perceptions of their responsibility, training, and experience with providing comprehensive health care services to adolescents. Methods: A 57-item, close-ended survey was designed and administered to assess resident perceptions of the scope of their practice, training, and experience with providing adolescent health care across a series of health care categories. Results: Of the 87 respondents (31 OB/GYN, 29 FM, and 27 pediatric), most residents from all three fields felt that the full range of adolescent preventive and clinical services represented in the survey fell under their scope of practice. Residents from all three fields need more training and experience with mental health issues, referring teenagers to substance abuse treatment programs, and addressing physical and sexual abuse. In addition, OBGYN residents reported deficiencies in training and experience regarding several preventive counseling and general health services, while pediatric residents reported deficiencies in training and experience regarding sexual health services. Conclusions: Our results indicate that at this time, residents from these three specialties are not optimally prepared to provide the full range of recommended preventive and clinical services to adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-141
Number of pages13
JournalYale Journal of Biology and Medicine
Volume82
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 2009

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Gynecology
Obstetrics
Adolescent Medicine
Pediatrics
Health care
Medicine
Health
Health Services
Comprehensive Health Care
Delivery of Health Care
Sex Offenses
Reproductive Health
Substance-Related Disorders
Counseling
Mental Health
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Adolescent medicine
  • Family practice
  • Gynecology
  • Internship and residency
  • Obstetrics
  • Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Adolescent medicine : Attitudes, training, and experience of pediatric, family medicine, and obstetric-gynecology residents. / Kershnar, Rebecca; Hooper, Charlene; Gold, Marji; Norwitz, Errol R.; Illuzzi, Jessica L.

In: Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, Vol. 82, No. 4, 12.2009, p. 129-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kershnar, Rebecca ; Hooper, Charlene ; Gold, Marji ; Norwitz, Errol R. ; Illuzzi, Jessica L. / Adolescent medicine : Attitudes, training, and experience of pediatric, family medicine, and obstetric-gynecology residents. In: Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 82, No. 4. pp. 129-141.
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