Adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion: A systematic review of the current literature

Wilsa M S Charles Malveaux, Alok D. Sharan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objectives are to comprehensively define adjacent segment disease; highlight advances in the approach to spinal disorders, present the identified risk factors; examine outcomes; and summarize current recommendations. The literature supports previous degeneration and altered biomechanics of the spine as causes of adjacent segment disease. Excessive facet degeneration is a risk factor. Clinical outcome scores show improvement irrespective of procedure type. The number of spinal segments fused, fusion level, and age yield conflicting reports regarding their contribution to adjacent segment disease. Arthroplasty, dynamic stabilization, and interspinous process implants are effective in decreasing incidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-274
Number of pages9
JournalSeminars in Spine Surgery
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Spinal Fusion
Biomechanical Phenomena
Arthroplasty
Spine
Incidence

Keywords

  • Adjacent level degeneration
  • Adjacent segment degeneration
  • Adjacent segment disease
  • Lumbar fusion
  • Spine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion : A systematic review of the current literature. / Charles Malveaux, Wilsa M S; Sharan, Alok D.

In: Seminars in Spine Surgery, Vol. 23, No. 4, 12.2011, p. 266-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Charles Malveaux, Wilsa M S ; Sharan, Alok D. / Adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion : A systematic review of the current literature. In: Seminars in Spine Surgery. 2011 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 266-274.
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