Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in children

Aileen Raizner, Uma Padhye Phatak, Kenneth Baker, Mohini G. Patel, Sohail Z. Husain, Dinesh S. Pashankar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe the etiologic factors, course, and outcome of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in children. Study design: We performed a retrospective study of children with necrotizing pancreatitis diagnosed during the last 21 years at Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital. Computed tomography (CT) criteria were used to diagnose necrotizing pancreatitis and to assess severity index. Charts were reviewed to collect demographics, etiology, details of hospital stay, complications, and outcome. Results: Seven children (mean age, 11.6 years; range, 4-17.8 years) had necrotizing pancreatitis. Etiologic factors were medications, diabetes, and gallstones. All had prolonged hospitalization (9-40 days; mean, 20 days) and 5 patients required admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. During the hospital stay, patients developed complications involving the respiratory, hematologic, renal, metabolic, and circulatory systems. All patients had aggressive supportive medical therapy, and none required surgery. There were no deaths attributable to pancreatitis. Late complications after hospital discharge occurred in 5 patients and included pseudocysts, transient hyperglycemia, diabetes, and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The CT severity index correlated with the risk of complications. Conclusions: A cute necrotizing pancreatitis has a variable etiology in children. CT scan is useful in the diagnosis and assessment of severity. Necrotizing pancreatitis in children is associated with severe acute and late complications and requires intensive medical therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)788-792
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume162
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis
Pancreatitis
Tomography
Length of Stay
Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency
Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Patient Admission
Gallstones
Cardiovascular System
Hyperglycemia
Hospitalization
Retrospective Studies
Demography
Kidney
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Raizner, A., Phatak, U. P., Baker, K., Patel, M. G., Husain, S. Z., & Pashankar, D. S. (2013). Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in children. Journal of Pediatrics, 162(4), 788-792. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.09.037

Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in children. / Raizner, Aileen; Phatak, Uma Padhye; Baker, Kenneth; Patel, Mohini G.; Husain, Sohail Z.; Pashankar, Dinesh S.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 162, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 788-792.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raizner, A, Phatak, UP, Baker, K, Patel, MG, Husain, SZ & Pashankar, DS 2013, 'Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in children', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 162, no. 4, pp. 788-792. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.09.037
Raizner A, Phatak UP, Baker K, Patel MG, Husain SZ, Pashankar DS. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in children. Journal of Pediatrics. 2013 Apr;162(4):788-792. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.09.037
Raizner, Aileen ; Phatak, Uma Padhye ; Baker, Kenneth ; Patel, Mohini G. ; Husain, Sohail Z. ; Pashankar, Dinesh S. / Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in children. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2013 ; Vol. 162, No. 4. pp. 788-792.
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