Acute fever

Jeffrey R. Avner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• Based on strong research evidence, there is no single value for normal body temperature; body temperature varies with a variety of specific individual and environmental factors, including age, sex, physical activity, ambient air temperature, and anatomic site of measurement. (6)(7) • Based on some research evidence, parental report of fever to touch has limited validity and possibly is more useful to exclude rather than to confirm the presence of fever. (10)(11) • Based on some research evidence, clinical appearance rather than the height of fever is a more powerful predictor of serious illness. (4)(14) • Based on some research evidence as well as on consensus, the utility of routine blood cultures and complete blood count is diminished in the evaluation of otherwise healthy, well-appearing, febrile 3- to 36-month-old children who have received pneumococcal vaccine. (17)(18)(19) • Based on strong research evidence, acetaminophen and ibuprofen have similar safety and analgesic effects for moderate and severe pain, but ibuprofen is a more effective antipyretic and provides a longer duration of antipyresis. (25) • Based on strong research evidence, fevers due to serious infection (such as bacteremia) are as responsive to antipyretic therapy as is less serious infection. Therefore, a reduction in the height of the temperature after antipyretic therapy does not distinguish between infectious causes. However, clinical experience indicates that a child who has a serious illness often continues to appear ill after fever is reduced, whereas the appearance of a child who has a benign illness usually improves. (29).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-14
Number of pages10
JournalPediatrics in Review
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

Fingerprint

Fever
Antipyretics
Research
Ibuprofen
Body Temperature
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Temperature
Blood Cell Count
Age Factors
Touch
Acetaminophen
Bacteremia
Infection
Analgesics
Consensus
Reference Values
Air
Exercise
Safety
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Acute fever. / Avner, Jeffrey R.

In: Pediatrics in Review, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 5-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Avner, JR 2009, 'Acute fever', Pediatrics in Review, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 5-14. https://doi.org/10.1542/pir.30-1-5
Avner, Jeffrey R. / Acute fever. In: Pediatrics in Review. 2009 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 5-14.
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