Activity-dependent plasticity of electrical synapses: Increasing evidence for its presence and functional roles in the mammalian brain

Julie S. Haas, Corey M. Greenwald, Alberto E. Pereda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gap junctions mediate electrical synaptic transmission between neurons. While the actions of neurotransmitter modulators on the conductance of gap junctions have been extensively documented, increasing evidence indicates they can also be influenced by the ongoing activity of neural networks, in most cases via local interactions with nearby glutamatergic synapses. We review here early evidence for the existence of activity-dependent regulatory mechanisms as well recent examples reported in mammalian brain. The ubiquitous distribution of both neuronal connexins and the molecules involved suggest this phenomenon is widespread and represents a property of electrical transmission in general.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number14
JournalBMC Cell Biology
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 2016

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Electrical Synapses
Gap Junctions
Connexins
Brain
Synaptic Transmission
Synapses
Neurotransmitter Agents
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Activity-dependent plasticity of electrical synapses : Increasing evidence for its presence and functional roles in the mammalian brain. / Haas, Julie S.; Greenwald, Corey M.; Pereda, Alberto E.

In: BMC Cell Biology, Vol. 17, No. 1, 14, 24.05.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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