Acquired circulating anticoagulants in children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

Edward R. Burns, B. Z. Krieger, L. Bernstein, Arye Rubinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mechanism underlying the prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) seen in some pediatric patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and opportunistic infections was studied. A circulating inhibitor of coagulation was demonstrated in three patients. The inhibitor appears to be an immunoglobulin that interferes with some of the phospholipid-dependent coagulation reactions of the intrinsic pathway. This 'AIDS anticoagulant' does not predispose the patient to clinical bleeding despite its ability to cause a marked prolongation of the APTT. As such, careful laboratory diagnosis of the cause of abnormal coagulation test results is necessary for children with AIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)763-765
Number of pages3
JournalPediatrics
Volume82
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1988

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Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Clinical Laboratory Techniques
Opportunistic Infections
Anticoagulants
Immunoglobulins
Phospholipids
Pediatrics
Hemorrhage
circulating anticoagulants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Acquired circulating anticoagulants in children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. / Burns, Edward R.; Krieger, B. Z.; Bernstein, L.; Rubinstein, Arye.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 82, No. 5, 1988, p. 763-765.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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