Acetabular fractures: What radiologists should know and how 3D CT can Aid Classification

Meir H. Scheinfeld, Akiva A. Dym, Michael Spektor, Laura L. Avery, R. Joshua Dym, Derek F. Amanatullah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Correct recognition, description, and classification of acetabular fractures is essential for efficient patient triage and treatment. Acetabular fractures may result from high-energy trauma or low-energy trauma in the elderly. The most widely used acetabular fracture classification system among radiologists and orthopedic surgeons is the system of Judet and Letournel, which includes five elementary (or elemental) and five associated fractures. The elementary fractures are anterior wall, posterior wall, anterior column, posterior column, and transverse. The associated fractures are all combinations or partial combinations of the elementary fractures and include transverse with posterior wall, T-shaped, associated both column, anterior column or wall with posterior hemitransverse, and posterior column with posterior wall. The most unique fracture is the associated both column fracture, which completely dissociates the acetabular articular surface from the sciatic buttress. Accurate categorization of acetabular fractures is challenging because of the complex three-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the pelvis, the rarity of certain acetabular fracture variants, and confusing nomenclature. Comparing a 3D image of the fractured acetabulum with a standard diagram containing the 10 Judet and Letournel categories of acetabular fracture and using a flowchart algorithm are effective ways of arriving at the correct fracture classification. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-577
Number of pages23
JournalRadiographics
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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    Scheinfeld, M. H., Dym, A. A., Spektor, M., Avery, L. L., Joshua Dym, R., & Amanatullah, D. F. (2015). Acetabular fractures: What radiologists should know and how 3D CT can Aid Classification. Radiographics, 35(2), 555-577. https://doi.org/10.1148/rg.352140098