Abuse and subclinical cardiovascular disease among midlife women

The study of women's health across the nation

Rebecca C. Thurston, Yuefang Chang, Carol A. Derby, Joyce T. Bromberger, Sioban D. Harlow, Imke Janssen, Karen A. Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - : Some evidence suggests that abuse may be related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among women. However, this relation has largely been addressed using self-reported measures of CVD. We tested whether a history of abuse was related to subclinical CVD among midlife women without clinical CVD. METHODS - : The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) is a longitudinal cohort study of women transitioning through the menopause. One thousand four hundred two white, black, Hispanic, and Chinese SWAN participants completed measures of childhood and adult physical and sexual abuse, underwent a blood draw, completed physical measures, and underwent a carotid artery ultrasound at SWAN study visit 12. Associations between abuse and intima media thickness and plaque were tested in linear and multinomial logistic regression models controlling for age, site, race/ethnicity, financial strain, education, body mass index, lipids, blood pressure, measures of insulin resistance, smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, and medication use. RESULTS - : Findings indicated that a history of childhood sexual abuse was associated with higher intima media thickness controlling for standard CVD risk factors and other confounders (β=0.022; SE=0.010; P<0.05; adjusted mean childhood sexual abuse: 0.800 mm versus no childhood sexual abuse: 0.782 mm). CONCLUSIONS - : Childhood sexual abuse was associated with higher intima media thickness controlling for CVD risk factors and other confounders. These findings indicate the importance of considering the potential impact of early-life stressors on women's later cardiovascular health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2246-2251
Number of pages6
JournalStroke
Volume45
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Women's Health
Sex Offenses
Cardiovascular Diseases
Logistic Models
Menopause
Carotid Arteries
Hispanic Americans
Longitudinal Studies
Insulin Resistance
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Smoking
Alcohols
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Lipids
Education
Health

Keywords

  • atherosclerosis
  • carotid intima media thickness
  • child abuse
  • menopause
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Thurston, R. C., Chang, Y., Derby, C. A., Bromberger, J. T., Harlow, S. D., Janssen, I., & Matthews, K. A. (2014). Abuse and subclinical cardiovascular disease among midlife women: The study of women's health across the nation. Stroke, 45(8), 2246-2251. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005928

Abuse and subclinical cardiovascular disease among midlife women : The study of women's health across the nation. / Thurston, Rebecca C.; Chang, Yuefang; Derby, Carol A.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Harlow, Sioban D.; Janssen, Imke; Matthews, Karen A.

In: Stroke, Vol. 45, No. 8, 2014, p. 2246-2251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thurston, RC, Chang, Y, Derby, CA, Bromberger, JT, Harlow, SD, Janssen, I & Matthews, KA 2014, 'Abuse and subclinical cardiovascular disease among midlife women: The study of women's health across the nation', Stroke, vol. 45, no. 8, pp. 2246-2251. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005928
Thurston, Rebecca C. ; Chang, Yuefang ; Derby, Carol A. ; Bromberger, Joyce T. ; Harlow, Sioban D. ; Janssen, Imke ; Matthews, Karen A. / Abuse and subclinical cardiovascular disease among midlife women : The study of women's health across the nation. In: Stroke. 2014 ; Vol. 45, No. 8. pp. 2246-2251.
@article{7aceaa5d242c4962a04672be3cfe8130,
title = "Abuse and subclinical cardiovascular disease among midlife women: The study of women's health across the nation",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - : Some evidence suggests that abuse may be related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among women. However, this relation has largely been addressed using self-reported measures of CVD. We tested whether a history of abuse was related to subclinical CVD among midlife women without clinical CVD. METHODS - : The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) is a longitudinal cohort study of women transitioning through the menopause. One thousand four hundred two white, black, Hispanic, and Chinese SWAN participants completed measures of childhood and adult physical and sexual abuse, underwent a blood draw, completed physical measures, and underwent a carotid artery ultrasound at SWAN study visit 12. Associations between abuse and intima media thickness and plaque were tested in linear and multinomial logistic regression models controlling for age, site, race/ethnicity, financial strain, education, body mass index, lipids, blood pressure, measures of insulin resistance, smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, and medication use. RESULTS - : Findings indicated that a history of childhood sexual abuse was associated with higher intima media thickness controlling for standard CVD risk factors and other confounders (β=0.022; SE=0.010; P<0.05; adjusted mean childhood sexual abuse: 0.800 mm versus no childhood sexual abuse: 0.782 mm). CONCLUSIONS - : Childhood sexual abuse was associated with higher intima media thickness controlling for CVD risk factors and other confounders. These findings indicate the importance of considering the potential impact of early-life stressors on women's later cardiovascular health.",
keywords = "atherosclerosis, carotid intima media thickness, child abuse, menopause, women",
author = "Thurston, {Rebecca C.} and Yuefang Chang and Derby, {Carol A.} and Bromberger, {Joyce T.} and Harlow, {Sioban D.} and Imke Janssen and Matthews, {Karen A.}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005928",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "2246--2251",
journal = "Stroke",
issn = "0039-2499",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Abuse and subclinical cardiovascular disease among midlife women

T2 - The study of women's health across the nation

AU - Thurston, Rebecca C.

AU - Chang, Yuefang

AU - Derby, Carol A.

AU - Bromberger, Joyce T.

AU - Harlow, Sioban D.

AU - Janssen, Imke

AU - Matthews, Karen A.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - : Some evidence suggests that abuse may be related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among women. However, this relation has largely been addressed using self-reported measures of CVD. We tested whether a history of abuse was related to subclinical CVD among midlife women without clinical CVD. METHODS - : The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) is a longitudinal cohort study of women transitioning through the menopause. One thousand four hundred two white, black, Hispanic, and Chinese SWAN participants completed measures of childhood and adult physical and sexual abuse, underwent a blood draw, completed physical measures, and underwent a carotid artery ultrasound at SWAN study visit 12. Associations between abuse and intima media thickness and plaque were tested in linear and multinomial logistic regression models controlling for age, site, race/ethnicity, financial strain, education, body mass index, lipids, blood pressure, measures of insulin resistance, smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, and medication use. RESULTS - : Findings indicated that a history of childhood sexual abuse was associated with higher intima media thickness controlling for standard CVD risk factors and other confounders (β=0.022; SE=0.010; P<0.05; adjusted mean childhood sexual abuse: 0.800 mm versus no childhood sexual abuse: 0.782 mm). CONCLUSIONS - : Childhood sexual abuse was associated with higher intima media thickness controlling for CVD risk factors and other confounders. These findings indicate the importance of considering the potential impact of early-life stressors on women's later cardiovascular health.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - : Some evidence suggests that abuse may be related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among women. However, this relation has largely been addressed using self-reported measures of CVD. We tested whether a history of abuse was related to subclinical CVD among midlife women without clinical CVD. METHODS - : The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) is a longitudinal cohort study of women transitioning through the menopause. One thousand four hundred two white, black, Hispanic, and Chinese SWAN participants completed measures of childhood and adult physical and sexual abuse, underwent a blood draw, completed physical measures, and underwent a carotid artery ultrasound at SWAN study visit 12. Associations between abuse and intima media thickness and plaque were tested in linear and multinomial logistic regression models controlling for age, site, race/ethnicity, financial strain, education, body mass index, lipids, blood pressure, measures of insulin resistance, smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, and medication use. RESULTS - : Findings indicated that a history of childhood sexual abuse was associated with higher intima media thickness controlling for standard CVD risk factors and other confounders (β=0.022; SE=0.010; P<0.05; adjusted mean childhood sexual abuse: 0.800 mm versus no childhood sexual abuse: 0.782 mm). CONCLUSIONS - : Childhood sexual abuse was associated with higher intima media thickness controlling for CVD risk factors and other confounders. These findings indicate the importance of considering the potential impact of early-life stressors on women's later cardiovascular health.

KW - atherosclerosis

KW - carotid intima media thickness

KW - child abuse

KW - menopause

KW - women

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905375517&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905375517&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005928

DO - 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005928

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 2246

EP - 2251

JO - Stroke

JF - Stroke

SN - 0039-2499

IS - 8

ER -