Absence of colony stimulation factor-1 receptor results in loss of microglia, disrupted brain development and olfactory deficits

Bryna Erblich, Liyin Zhu, Anne M. Etgen, Kostantin Dobrenis, Jeffrey W. Pollard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

207 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brain contains numerous mononuclear phagocytes called microglia. These cells express the transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor for the macrophage growth factor colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1R). Using a CSF-1R-GFP reporter mouse strain combined with lineage defining antibody staining we show in the postnatal mouse brain that CSF-1R is expressed only in microglia and not neurons, astrocytes or glial cells. To study CSF-1R function we used mice homozygous for a null mutation in the Csflr gene. In these mice microglia are >99% depleted at embryonic day 16 and day 1 post-partum brain. At three weeks of age this microglial depletion continues in most regions of the brain although some contain clusters of rounded microglia. Despite the loss of microglia, embryonic brain development appears normal but during the post-natal period the brain architecture becomes perturbed with enlarged ventricles and regionally compressed parenchyma, phenotypes most prominent in the olfactory bulb and cortex. In the cortex there is increased neuronal density, elevated numbers of astrocytes but reduced numbers of oligodendrocytes. Csf1r nulls rarely survive to adulthood and therefore to study the role of CSF-1R in olfaction we used the viable null mutants in the Csf1 (Csf1 op) gene that encodes one of the two known CSF-1R ligands. Food-finding experiments indicate that olfactory capacity is significantly impaired in the absence of CSF-1. CSF-1R is therefore required for the development of microglia, for a fully functional olfactory system and the maintenance of normal brain structure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere26317
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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neuroglia
Microglia
Brain
brain
receptors
Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
astrocytes
mice
Astrocytes
cortex
Genes
macrophage colony-stimulating factor
olfactory bulb
Smell
Macrophages
Olfactory Bulb
phagocytes
Oligodendroglia
postpartum period
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Absence of colony stimulation factor-1 receptor results in loss of microglia, disrupted brain development and olfactory deficits. / Erblich, Bryna; Zhu, Liyin; Etgen, Anne M.; Dobrenis, Kostantin; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 10, e26317, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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