Abnormal thiamine-dependent processes in Alzheimer's Disease. Lessons from diabetes

Gary E. Gibson, Joseph A. Hirsch, Rosanna T. Cirio, Barry D. Jordan, Pasquale Fonzetti, Jessica Elder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reduced glucose metabolism is an invariant feature of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and an outstanding biomarker of disease progression. Glucose metabolism may be an attractive therapeutic target, whether the decline initiates AD pathophysiology or is a critical component of a cascade. The cause of cerebral regional glucose hypometabolism remains unclear. Thiamine-dependent processes are critical in glucose metabolism and are diminished in brains of AD patients at autopsy. Further, the reductions in thiamine-dependent processes are highly correlated to the decline in clinical dementia rating scales. In animal models, thiamine deficiency exacerbates plaque formation, promotes phosphorylation of tau and impairs memory. In contrast, treatment of mouse models of AD with the thiamine derivative benfotiamine diminishes plaques, decreases phosphorylation of tau and reverses memory deficits. Diabetes predisposes to AD, which suggests they may share some common mechanisms. Benfotiamine diminishes peripheral neuropathy in diabetic humans and animals. In diabetes, benfotiamine induces key thiamine-dependent enzymes of the pentose shunt to reduce accumulation of toxic metabolites including advanced glycation end products (AGE). Related mechanisms may lead to reversal of plaque formation by benfotiamine in animals. If so, the use of benfotiamine could provide a safe intervention to reverse biological and clinical processes of AD progression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurodegeneration'.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-25
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular and Cellular Neuroscience
Volume55
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thiamine
Alzheimer Disease
Glucose
Disease Progression
Phosphorylation
Thiamine Deficiency
Biological Phenomena
Pentose Phosphate Pathway
Advanced Glycosylation End Products
Poisons
Memory Disorders
Brain Diseases
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Dementia
Autopsy
Animal Models
Biomarkers
benphothiamine
Enzymes
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Diabetes
  • Mitochondria
  • Pentose shunt
  • Thiamine
  • Transketolase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Abnormal thiamine-dependent processes in Alzheimer's Disease. Lessons from diabetes. / Gibson, Gary E.; Hirsch, Joseph A.; Cirio, Rosanna T.; Jordan, Barry D.; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Elder, Jessica.

In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Vol. 55, 01.07.2013, p. 17-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gibson, Gary E. ; Hirsch, Joseph A. ; Cirio, Rosanna T. ; Jordan, Barry D. ; Fonzetti, Pasquale ; Elder, Jessica. / Abnormal thiamine-dependent processes in Alzheimer's Disease. Lessons from diabetes. In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience. 2013 ; Vol. 55. pp. 17-25.
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