A single source of health care

Does it affect health experiences for inner-city children?

Anne C. Beal, Ruth E. K. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study was designed to determine whether having a single source of health care affects the health experiences of inner-city children. Seventy-five women were interviewed about the health experiences of their preschool-aged children (range 10-58 months) and were asked about utilization, emergency room use, preventive care, delays in care, and availability of a provider for the child's various medical needs. While most (94.7 percent) of the mothers identified a regular source of care for their child's preventive care, 74.7 percent named the same source for their child's sick care. There were no differences in most measures between mothers with a single source of care and those with multiple sources. However, those with a single source of care reported feeling their providers were more available (p < 0.05). Thus, naming a single source of health care may not be a useful indicator of better health experiences for inner-city children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-162
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 2000

Fingerprint

Preventive Medicine
health care
Child Care
Delivery of Health Care
Health
health
Mothers
experience
Preschool Children
Hospital Emergency Service
Emotions
utilization

Keywords

  • Access to care
  • Children
  • Inner city
  • Pediatrics
  • Usual source of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A single source of health care : Does it affect health experiences for inner-city children? / Beal, Anne C.; Stein, Ruth E. K.

In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 11, No. 2, 05.2000, p. 151-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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