A Single Dominant Gene Can Account for Eye Tracking Dysfunctions and Schizophrenia in Offspring of Discordant Twins

Philip S. Holzman, Einar Kringlen, Steven Matthysse, Steven D. Flanagan, Richard B. Lipton, Gunnar Cramer, Smadar Levin, Kenneth Lange, Deborah L. Levy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

199 Scopus citations

Abstract

Eye movement dysfunctions (EMDs), detectable during smooth pursuit, occur in a majority of schizophrenics and in 45% of their first-degree relatives. Previous data suggest that they represent a biologic marker for schizophrenia. To determine the mode of transmission of the schizophrenia-EMD complex, the eye movements of offspring of monozygotic and dizygotic twins were recorded. One group of twins was discordant for schizophrenia; the other group for manic depression or reactive psychosis. The data suggest that EMDs and at least some schizophrenias can be considered expressions of a single underlying trait that is transmitted by an autosomal dominant gene.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)641-647
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume45
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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