A retrospective review of acupuncture use for the treatment of pain in sickle cell disease patients: Descriptive analysis from a single institution

Kit Lu, Mok Chung Jennifer Cheng, Xiaoying Ge, Ann Berger, Dihua Xu, Gregory J. Kato, Caterina P. Minniti

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:: This retrospective study describes the use of acupuncture for adult sickle cell patients in a single institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: We identified 47 sickle cell disease patients referred for acupuncture at the National Institutes of Health between January 2005 and September 2011. All patients were enrolled in a Study of the Natural History of sickle cell disease and signed consent. We reviewed patient demographics, location of acupuncture treatment sessions (inpatient vs. outpatient), number of sessions received, sites of pain, patient pain reporting, and the use of other complementary therapies. RESULTS:: Of the 47 patients (60% women, median age 36 y) referred for acupuncture, 42 had homozygous SS disease (89%) and 5 had SC disease (11%). Over half of the patients (51%) reported >3 sites of pain. Only 24 patients (51%) underwent acupuncture treatment. Of those who elected not to receive acupuncture, a majority (87%) accepted some other forms of complementary therapies. Nine patients underwent only inpatient acupuncture for acute vaso-occlusive crisis. Eleven patients received only outpatient acupuncture treatment for chronic pain, and 4 patients received both inpatient and outpatient treatments. For the patients who received inpatient acupuncture treatment for acute vaso-occlusive crisis, there was a significant reduction of reported pain score immediately after acupuncture treatment with an average pain reduction of 2.1 points on the numeric pain scale (P<0.0001). Excluding the 2 outliers, 75% of patients (n=13) in the outpatient setting described their pain as improved compared with prior session. DISCUSSION:: To our knowledge, this is the largest retrospective review of acupuncture use in the sickle cell population. This analysis describes the use of acupuncture and raises the possibility of its use as an adjuvant for pain management in this population. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate acupuncture's efficacy and effectiveness for pain management in different treatment settings and for various types of pain etiologies among the sickle cell population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)825-830
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acupuncture Therapy
Sickle Cell Anemia
Acupuncture
Pain
Inpatients
Outpatients
Pain Management
Complementary Therapies
Hemoglobin SC Disease
Population
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Chronic Pain

Keywords

  • acupuncture
  • acute pain
  • chronic pain
  • pain management
  • sickle cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A retrospective review of acupuncture use for the treatment of pain in sickle cell disease patients : Descriptive analysis from a single institution. / Lu, Kit; Cheng, Mok Chung Jennifer; Ge, Xiaoying; Berger, Ann; Xu, Dihua; Kato, Gregory J.; Minniti, Caterina P.

In: Clinical Journal of Pain, Vol. 30, No. 9, 2014, p. 825-830.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Lu, Kit ; Cheng, Mok Chung Jennifer ; Ge, Xiaoying ; Berger, Ann ; Xu, Dihua ; Kato, Gregory J. ; Minniti, Caterina P. / A retrospective review of acupuncture use for the treatment of pain in sickle cell disease patients : Descriptive analysis from a single institution. In: Clinical Journal of Pain. 2014 ; Vol. 30, No. 9. pp. 825-830.
@article{25dd731dde83420fbaeac0f6ee5a08bd,
title = "A retrospective review of acupuncture use for the treatment of pain in sickle cell disease patients: Descriptive analysis from a single institution",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES:: This retrospective study describes the use of acupuncture for adult sickle cell patients in a single institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: We identified 47 sickle cell disease patients referred for acupuncture at the National Institutes of Health between January 2005 and September 2011. All patients were enrolled in a Study of the Natural History of sickle cell disease and signed consent. We reviewed patient demographics, location of acupuncture treatment sessions (inpatient vs. outpatient), number of sessions received, sites of pain, patient pain reporting, and the use of other complementary therapies. RESULTS:: Of the 47 patients (60{\%} women, median age 36 y) referred for acupuncture, 42 had homozygous SS disease (89{\%}) and 5 had SC disease (11{\%}). Over half of the patients (51{\%}) reported >3 sites of pain. Only 24 patients (51{\%}) underwent acupuncture treatment. Of those who elected not to receive acupuncture, a majority (87{\%}) accepted some other forms of complementary therapies. Nine patients underwent only inpatient acupuncture for acute vaso-occlusive crisis. Eleven patients received only outpatient acupuncture treatment for chronic pain, and 4 patients received both inpatient and outpatient treatments. For the patients who received inpatient acupuncture treatment for acute vaso-occlusive crisis, there was a significant reduction of reported pain score immediately after acupuncture treatment with an average pain reduction of 2.1 points on the numeric pain scale (P<0.0001). Excluding the 2 outliers, 75{\%} of patients (n=13) in the outpatient setting described their pain as improved compared with prior session. DISCUSSION:: To our knowledge, this is the largest retrospective review of acupuncture use in the sickle cell population. This analysis describes the use of acupuncture and raises the possibility of its use as an adjuvant for pain management in this population. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate acupuncture's efficacy and effectiveness for pain management in different treatment settings and for various types of pain etiologies among the sickle cell population.",
keywords = "acupuncture, acute pain, chronic pain, pain management, sickle cell",
author = "Kit Lu and Cheng, {Mok Chung Jennifer} and Xiaoying Ge and Ann Berger and Dihua Xu and Kato, {Gregory J.} and Minniti, {Caterina P.}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1097/AJP.0000000000000036",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "825--830",
journal = "Clinical Journal of Pain",
issn = "0749-8047",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A retrospective review of acupuncture use for the treatment of pain in sickle cell disease patients

T2 - Descriptive analysis from a single institution

AU - Lu, Kit

AU - Cheng, Mok Chung Jennifer

AU - Ge, Xiaoying

AU - Berger, Ann

AU - Xu, Dihua

AU - Kato, Gregory J.

AU - Minniti, Caterina P.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - OBJECTIVES:: This retrospective study describes the use of acupuncture for adult sickle cell patients in a single institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: We identified 47 sickle cell disease patients referred for acupuncture at the National Institutes of Health between January 2005 and September 2011. All patients were enrolled in a Study of the Natural History of sickle cell disease and signed consent. We reviewed patient demographics, location of acupuncture treatment sessions (inpatient vs. outpatient), number of sessions received, sites of pain, patient pain reporting, and the use of other complementary therapies. RESULTS:: Of the 47 patients (60% women, median age 36 y) referred for acupuncture, 42 had homozygous SS disease (89%) and 5 had SC disease (11%). Over half of the patients (51%) reported >3 sites of pain. Only 24 patients (51%) underwent acupuncture treatment. Of those who elected not to receive acupuncture, a majority (87%) accepted some other forms of complementary therapies. Nine patients underwent only inpatient acupuncture for acute vaso-occlusive crisis. Eleven patients received only outpatient acupuncture treatment for chronic pain, and 4 patients received both inpatient and outpatient treatments. For the patients who received inpatient acupuncture treatment for acute vaso-occlusive crisis, there was a significant reduction of reported pain score immediately after acupuncture treatment with an average pain reduction of 2.1 points on the numeric pain scale (P<0.0001). Excluding the 2 outliers, 75% of patients (n=13) in the outpatient setting described their pain as improved compared with prior session. DISCUSSION:: To our knowledge, this is the largest retrospective review of acupuncture use in the sickle cell population. This analysis describes the use of acupuncture and raises the possibility of its use as an adjuvant for pain management in this population. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate acupuncture's efficacy and effectiveness for pain management in different treatment settings and for various types of pain etiologies among the sickle cell population.

AB - OBJECTIVES:: This retrospective study describes the use of acupuncture for adult sickle cell patients in a single institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: We identified 47 sickle cell disease patients referred for acupuncture at the National Institutes of Health between January 2005 and September 2011. All patients were enrolled in a Study of the Natural History of sickle cell disease and signed consent. We reviewed patient demographics, location of acupuncture treatment sessions (inpatient vs. outpatient), number of sessions received, sites of pain, patient pain reporting, and the use of other complementary therapies. RESULTS:: Of the 47 patients (60% women, median age 36 y) referred for acupuncture, 42 had homozygous SS disease (89%) and 5 had SC disease (11%). Over half of the patients (51%) reported >3 sites of pain. Only 24 patients (51%) underwent acupuncture treatment. Of those who elected not to receive acupuncture, a majority (87%) accepted some other forms of complementary therapies. Nine patients underwent only inpatient acupuncture for acute vaso-occlusive crisis. Eleven patients received only outpatient acupuncture treatment for chronic pain, and 4 patients received both inpatient and outpatient treatments. For the patients who received inpatient acupuncture treatment for acute vaso-occlusive crisis, there was a significant reduction of reported pain score immediately after acupuncture treatment with an average pain reduction of 2.1 points on the numeric pain scale (P<0.0001). Excluding the 2 outliers, 75% of patients (n=13) in the outpatient setting described their pain as improved compared with prior session. DISCUSSION:: To our knowledge, this is the largest retrospective review of acupuncture use in the sickle cell population. This analysis describes the use of acupuncture and raises the possibility of its use as an adjuvant for pain management in this population. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate acupuncture's efficacy and effectiveness for pain management in different treatment settings and for various types of pain etiologies among the sickle cell population.

KW - acupuncture

KW - acute pain

KW - chronic pain

KW - pain management

KW - sickle cell

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84906097084&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84906097084&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000036

DO - 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000036

M3 - Review article

C2 - 24322996

AN - SCOPUS:84906097084

VL - 30

SP - 825

EP - 830

JO - Clinical Journal of Pain

JF - Clinical Journal of Pain

SN - 0749-8047

IS - 9

ER -