A randomized controlled trial of meditation and massage effects on quality of life in people with late-stage disease

A pilot study

Anna Leila Williams, Peter A. Selwyn, Lauren Liberti, Susan Molde, Valentine Yanchou Njike, Ruth McCorkle, Daniel Zelterman, David L. Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Certain meditation practices may effectively address spiritual needs near end-of-life, an often overlooked aspect of quality of life (QOL). Among people subject to physical isolation, meditation benefits may be blunted unless physical contact is also addressed. Objective: To evaluate independent and interactive effects of Metta meditation and massage on QOL in people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Design: Randomized controlled blinded factorial pilot trial conducted from November 2001 to September 2003. Setting: An AIDS-dedicated skilled nursing facility in New Haven, Connecticut. Participants: Fifty-eight residents (43% women) with late stage disease (AIDS or comorbidity). Interventions: Residents were randomized to 1 month of meditation, massage, combined meditation and massage, or standard care. The meditation group received instruction, then self-administered a meditation audiocassette daily. A certified massage therapist provided the massage intervention 30 minutes per day 5 days per week. Outcome measure: Changes on Missoula-Vitas QOL Index overall and transcendent (spiritual) scores at 8 weeks. Results: The combined group showed improvement in overall (p = 0.005) and transcendent (p = 0.01) scores from baseline to 8 weeks, a change significantly greater (p < 0.05) than the meditation, massage, and control groups. Conclusions: The combination of meditation and massage has a significantly favorable influence on overall and spiritual QOL in late-stage disease relative to standard care, or either intervention component alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)939-952
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Palliative Medicine
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

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Meditation
Massage
Randomized Controlled Trials
Quality of Life
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Comorbidity
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A randomized controlled trial of meditation and massage effects on quality of life in people with late-stage disease : A pilot study. / Williams, Anna Leila; Selwyn, Peter A.; Liberti, Lauren; Molde, Susan; Njike, Valentine Yanchou; McCorkle, Ruth; Zelterman, Daniel; Katz, David L.

In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 5, 10.2005, p. 939-952.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, Anna Leila ; Selwyn, Peter A. ; Liberti, Lauren ; Molde, Susan ; Njike, Valentine Yanchou ; McCorkle, Ruth ; Zelterman, Daniel ; Katz, David L. / A randomized controlled trial of meditation and massage effects on quality of life in people with late-stage disease : A pilot study. In: Journal of Palliative Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 939-952.
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