A prospective controlled study to determine the blood propofol concentration in anesthesiologists exposed to propofol vapor in the expired gases of patients receiving propofol-based intravenous sedation

Ming Xiong, Rex Ponnudurai, Catherine Schoenberg, Chunxiang Zhang, Ellise S. Delphin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective: To determine the blood propofol concentration of anesthesiologists who were exposed to the expired gases of patients receiving propofol-based intravenous (IV) sedation. Design: Prospective controlled investigation and laboratory analysis. Setting: Operating room of a university hospital and an independent technical laboratory. Subjects: 5 anesthesiologists who independently delivered propofol-based IV sedation to patients presenting for first trimester termination of pregnancy. In addition, a patient receiving propofol-based IV sedation was recruited as a positive control. A laboratory technician who never had previous exposure to propofol was recruited as a negative control. Interventions: Blood samples were obtained from each anesthesiologist before and after an 8-hour work period of anesthesia care of patients as described above. Blood samples were also obtained from the positive control, following propofol-based IV sedation, and the negative control. Measurements: An independent laboratory determined the blood propofol concentrations using a gas-liquid partition chromatograph and verified the results by repeated measurements in order to avoid a laboratory error. The gas-liquid partition chromatograph had an analytic capability that set the detection limit for propofol at 50 ng/mL. Main Results: None of the anesthesiologists had detectable blood propofol concentration in either the pre-exposure or post-exposure sample. The positive control and the negative control had detectable and non-detectable blood propofol concentration, respectively. Conclusions: This experiment did not detect propofol in the blood of anesthesiologists who administered propofol-based IV sedation to patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-551
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Propofol
Gases
Prospective Studies
Anesthesiologists
Laboratory Personnel
First Pregnancy Trimester
Operating Rooms
Limit of Detection
Patient Care
Anesthesia

Keywords

  • Anesthesiologists
  • Blood concentration
  • Gas chromatography
  • Propofol vapor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

@article{bdc2b72f497e40968aaec0cd6262d907,
title = "A prospective controlled study to determine the blood propofol concentration in anesthesiologists exposed to propofol vapor in the expired gases of patients receiving propofol-based intravenous sedation",
abstract = "Study Objective: To determine the blood propofol concentration of anesthesiologists who were exposed to the expired gases of patients receiving propofol-based intravenous (IV) sedation. Design: Prospective controlled investigation and laboratory analysis. Setting: Operating room of a university hospital and an independent technical laboratory. Subjects: 5 anesthesiologists who independently delivered propofol-based IV sedation to patients presenting for first trimester termination of pregnancy. In addition, a patient receiving propofol-based IV sedation was recruited as a positive control. A laboratory technician who never had previous exposure to propofol was recruited as a negative control. Interventions: Blood samples were obtained from each anesthesiologist before and after an 8-hour work period of anesthesia care of patients as described above. Blood samples were also obtained from the positive control, following propofol-based IV sedation, and the negative control. Measurements: An independent laboratory determined the blood propofol concentrations using a gas-liquid partition chromatograph and verified the results by repeated measurements in order to avoid a laboratory error. The gas-liquid partition chromatograph had an analytic capability that set the detection limit for propofol at 50 ng/mL. Main Results: None of the anesthesiologists had detectable blood propofol concentration in either the pre-exposure or post-exposure sample. The positive control and the negative control had detectable and non-detectable blood propofol concentration, respectively. Conclusions: This experiment did not detect propofol in the blood of anesthesiologists who administered propofol-based IV sedation to patients.",
keywords = "Anesthesiologists, Blood concentration, Gas chromatography, Propofol vapor",
author = "Ming Xiong and Rex Ponnudurai and Catherine Schoenberg and Chunxiang Zhang and Delphin, {Ellise S.}",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.jclinane.2011.02.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "549--551",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Anesthesia",
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T1 - A prospective controlled study to determine the blood propofol concentration in anesthesiologists exposed to propofol vapor in the expired gases of patients receiving propofol-based intravenous sedation

AU - Xiong, Ming

AU - Ponnudurai, Rex

AU - Schoenberg, Catherine

AU - Zhang, Chunxiang

AU - Delphin, Ellise S.

PY - 2011/11

Y1 - 2011/11

N2 - Study Objective: To determine the blood propofol concentration of anesthesiologists who were exposed to the expired gases of patients receiving propofol-based intravenous (IV) sedation. Design: Prospective controlled investigation and laboratory analysis. Setting: Operating room of a university hospital and an independent technical laboratory. Subjects: 5 anesthesiologists who independently delivered propofol-based IV sedation to patients presenting for first trimester termination of pregnancy. In addition, a patient receiving propofol-based IV sedation was recruited as a positive control. A laboratory technician who never had previous exposure to propofol was recruited as a negative control. Interventions: Blood samples were obtained from each anesthesiologist before and after an 8-hour work period of anesthesia care of patients as described above. Blood samples were also obtained from the positive control, following propofol-based IV sedation, and the negative control. Measurements: An independent laboratory determined the blood propofol concentrations using a gas-liquid partition chromatograph and verified the results by repeated measurements in order to avoid a laboratory error. The gas-liquid partition chromatograph had an analytic capability that set the detection limit for propofol at 50 ng/mL. Main Results: None of the anesthesiologists had detectable blood propofol concentration in either the pre-exposure or post-exposure sample. The positive control and the negative control had detectable and non-detectable blood propofol concentration, respectively. Conclusions: This experiment did not detect propofol in the blood of anesthesiologists who administered propofol-based IV sedation to patients.

AB - Study Objective: To determine the blood propofol concentration of anesthesiologists who were exposed to the expired gases of patients receiving propofol-based intravenous (IV) sedation. Design: Prospective controlled investigation and laboratory analysis. Setting: Operating room of a university hospital and an independent technical laboratory. Subjects: 5 anesthesiologists who independently delivered propofol-based IV sedation to patients presenting for first trimester termination of pregnancy. In addition, a patient receiving propofol-based IV sedation was recruited as a positive control. A laboratory technician who never had previous exposure to propofol was recruited as a negative control. Interventions: Blood samples were obtained from each anesthesiologist before and after an 8-hour work period of anesthesia care of patients as described above. Blood samples were also obtained from the positive control, following propofol-based IV sedation, and the negative control. Measurements: An independent laboratory determined the blood propofol concentrations using a gas-liquid partition chromatograph and verified the results by repeated measurements in order to avoid a laboratory error. The gas-liquid partition chromatograph had an analytic capability that set the detection limit for propofol at 50 ng/mL. Main Results: None of the anesthesiologists had detectable blood propofol concentration in either the pre-exposure or post-exposure sample. The positive control and the negative control had detectable and non-detectable blood propofol concentration, respectively. Conclusions: This experiment did not detect propofol in the blood of anesthesiologists who administered propofol-based IV sedation to patients.

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KW - Blood concentration

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