A profile of human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescents receiving health care services at selected sites in the United States

Audrey Smith Rogers, Donna C. Futterman, Linda Levin, Lawrence D'Angelo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the demographic/clinical pro-file of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adolescents in care at selected sites. Methods: We mailed surveys requesting prevalence data from physicians in government-funded HIV research and care programs on HIV-infected youth (10- 21 years) receiving care. Results: A total of 49% responses yielded information on 978 subjects. Vertical, blood, and sexual were predominant transmission modes. Three-quarters were of an ethnic/racial minority; 50% were female. The earliest median CD4 count was 0.467 x 109/liter (467/μl). Percent asymptomatic varied by transmission: vertical (16%), blood products (40%), male-male sexual (67%) and female-male sexual (M: 73%) (F: 74%). Clinically indicated Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis was differentially prescribed: vertical (96%), blood (89%), and sexual (male-male-47%) (female-male: M: 36% and F: 56%). Of these youth 78% are not represented in national AIDS case data. Conclusions: Examination of numerator data from selected sites indicates three transmission-driven adolescent HIV epidemics with different characteristics. Minority youth are disproportionately represented; many vertically infected infants are surviving to adolescence; sexual activity is a significant transmission avenue. HIV-infected youth appear to enter care with considerable immunosuppression. Clinical profiles and treatment patterns appear to differ by transmission mode. Further study is needed on adolescent HIV disease progression and determinants of access to care and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-408
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1996

Fingerprint

Health Services
HIV
Delivery of Health Care
Pneumocystis Pneumonia
Adolescent Health
Virus Diseases
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Sexual Behavior
Immunosuppression
Disease Progression
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Demography
Physicians
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • AIDS
  • HIV infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

A profile of human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescents receiving health care services at selected sites in the United States. / Rogers, Audrey Smith; Futterman, Donna C.; Levin, Linda; D'Angelo, Lawrence.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 19, No. 6, 12.1996, p. 401-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6676408a98274883a88dead297365475,
title = "A profile of human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescents receiving health care services at selected sites in the United States",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the demographic/clinical pro-file of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adolescents in care at selected sites. Methods: We mailed surveys requesting prevalence data from physicians in government-funded HIV research and care programs on HIV-infected youth (10- 21 years) receiving care. Results: A total of 49{\%} responses yielded information on 978 subjects. Vertical, blood, and sexual were predominant transmission modes. Three-quarters were of an ethnic/racial minority; 50{\%} were female. The earliest median CD4 count was 0.467 x 109/liter (467/μl). Percent asymptomatic varied by transmission: vertical (16{\%}), blood products (40{\%}), male-male sexual (67{\%}) and female-male sexual (M: 73{\%}) (F: 74{\%}). Clinically indicated Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis was differentially prescribed: vertical (96{\%}), blood (89{\%}), and sexual (male-male-47{\%}) (female-male: M: 36{\%} and F: 56{\%}). Of these youth 78{\%} are not represented in national AIDS case data. Conclusions: Examination of numerator data from selected sites indicates three transmission-driven adolescent HIV epidemics with different characteristics. Minority youth are disproportionately represented; many vertically infected infants are surviving to adolescence; sexual activity is a significant transmission avenue. HIV-infected youth appear to enter care with considerable immunosuppression. Clinical profiles and treatment patterns appear to differ by transmission mode. Further study is needed on adolescent HIV disease progression and determinants of access to care and treatment.",
keywords = "Adolescents, AIDS, HIV infection",
author = "Rogers, {Audrey Smith} and Futterman, {Donna C.} and Linda Levin and Lawrence D'Angelo",
year = "1996",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/S1054-139X(96)00051-1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "401--408",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A profile of human immunodeficiency virus-infected adolescents receiving health care services at selected sites in the United States

AU - Rogers, Audrey Smith

AU - Futterman, Donna C.

AU - Levin, Linda

AU - D'Angelo, Lawrence

PY - 1996/12

Y1 - 1996/12

N2 - Objective: To determine the demographic/clinical pro-file of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adolescents in care at selected sites. Methods: We mailed surveys requesting prevalence data from physicians in government-funded HIV research and care programs on HIV-infected youth (10- 21 years) receiving care. Results: A total of 49% responses yielded information on 978 subjects. Vertical, blood, and sexual were predominant transmission modes. Three-quarters were of an ethnic/racial minority; 50% were female. The earliest median CD4 count was 0.467 x 109/liter (467/μl). Percent asymptomatic varied by transmission: vertical (16%), blood products (40%), male-male sexual (67%) and female-male sexual (M: 73%) (F: 74%). Clinically indicated Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis was differentially prescribed: vertical (96%), blood (89%), and sexual (male-male-47%) (female-male: M: 36% and F: 56%). Of these youth 78% are not represented in national AIDS case data. Conclusions: Examination of numerator data from selected sites indicates three transmission-driven adolescent HIV epidemics with different characteristics. Minority youth are disproportionately represented; many vertically infected infants are surviving to adolescence; sexual activity is a significant transmission avenue. HIV-infected youth appear to enter care with considerable immunosuppression. Clinical profiles and treatment patterns appear to differ by transmission mode. Further study is needed on adolescent HIV disease progression and determinants of access to care and treatment.

AB - Objective: To determine the demographic/clinical pro-file of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adolescents in care at selected sites. Methods: We mailed surveys requesting prevalence data from physicians in government-funded HIV research and care programs on HIV-infected youth (10- 21 years) receiving care. Results: A total of 49% responses yielded information on 978 subjects. Vertical, blood, and sexual were predominant transmission modes. Three-quarters were of an ethnic/racial minority; 50% were female. The earliest median CD4 count was 0.467 x 109/liter (467/μl). Percent asymptomatic varied by transmission: vertical (16%), blood products (40%), male-male sexual (67%) and female-male sexual (M: 73%) (F: 74%). Clinically indicated Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis was differentially prescribed: vertical (96%), blood (89%), and sexual (male-male-47%) (female-male: M: 36% and F: 56%). Of these youth 78% are not represented in national AIDS case data. Conclusions: Examination of numerator data from selected sites indicates three transmission-driven adolescent HIV epidemics with different characteristics. Minority youth are disproportionately represented; many vertically infected infants are surviving to adolescence; sexual activity is a significant transmission avenue. HIV-infected youth appear to enter care with considerable immunosuppression. Clinical profiles and treatment patterns appear to differ by transmission mode. Further study is needed on adolescent HIV disease progression and determinants of access to care and treatment.

KW - Adolescents

KW - AIDS

KW - HIV infection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030477707&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030477707&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1054-139X(96)00051-1

DO - 10.1016/S1054-139X(96)00051-1

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 401

EP - 408

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 6

ER -