A novel drill set for the enhancement and assessment of robotic surgical performance

Charles Y. Ro, Ioannis K. Toumpoulis, Robert C. Ashton, Celina Imielinska, Tony Jebara, Seung H. Shin, J. D. Zipkin, James J. McGinty, George J. Todd, Joseph DeRose

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There currently exist several training modules to improve performance during video-assisted surgery. The unique characteristics of robotic surgery make these platforms an inadequate environment for the development and assessment of robotic surgical performance. Methods: Expert surgeons (n = 4) (>50 clinical robotic procedures and >2 years of clinical robotic experience) were compared to novice surgeons (n = 17) (<5 clinical cases and limited laboratory experience) using the da Vinci Surgical System. Seven drills were designed to simulate clinical robotic surgical tasks. Performance score was calculated by the equation Time to Completion + (minor error) × 5 + (major error) × 10. The Robotic Learning Curve (RLC) was expressed as a trend line of the performance scores corresponding to each repeated drill. Results: Performance scores for experts were better than novices in all 7 drills (p<0.05). The RLC for novices reflected an improvement in scores (p<0.05). In contrast, experts demonstrated a flat RLC for 6 drills and an improvement in one drill (p = 0.027). Conclusion: This new drill set provides a framework for performance assessment during robotic surgery. The inclusion of particular drills and their role in training robotic surgeons of the future awaits larger validation studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Pages418-421
Number of pages4
Volume111
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event13th Annual Conference on Medicine Meets Virtual Reality: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005 - Long Beach, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 26 2005Jan 29 2005

Other

Other13th Annual Conference on Medicine Meets Virtual Reality: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005
CountryUnited States
CityLong Beach, CA
Period1/26/051/29/05

Fingerprint

Mandrillus
Robotics
Learning Curve
Video-Assisted Surgery
Surgery
Validation Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Ro, C. Y., Toumpoulis, I. K., Ashton, R. C., Imielinska, C., Jebara, T., Shin, S. H., ... DeRose, J. (2005). A novel drill set for the enhancement and assessment of robotic surgical performance. In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics (Vol. 111, pp. 418-421)

A novel drill set for the enhancement and assessment of robotic surgical performance. / Ro, Charles Y.; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Ashton, Robert C.; Imielinska, Celina; Jebara, Tony; Shin, Seung H.; Zipkin, J. D.; McGinty, James J.; Todd, George J.; DeRose, Joseph.

Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 111 2005. p. 418-421.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ro, CY, Toumpoulis, IK, Ashton, RC, Imielinska, C, Jebara, T, Shin, SH, Zipkin, JD, McGinty, JJ, Todd, GJ & DeRose, J 2005, A novel drill set for the enhancement and assessment of robotic surgical performance. in Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. vol. 111, pp. 418-421, 13th Annual Conference on Medicine Meets Virtual Reality: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005, Long Beach, CA, United States, 1/26/05.
Ro CY, Toumpoulis IK, Ashton RC, Imielinska C, Jebara T, Shin SH et al. A novel drill set for the enhancement and assessment of robotic surgical performance. In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 111. 2005. p. 418-421
Ro, Charles Y. ; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K. ; Ashton, Robert C. ; Imielinska, Celina ; Jebara, Tony ; Shin, Seung H. ; Zipkin, J. D. ; McGinty, James J. ; Todd, George J. ; DeRose, Joseph. / A novel drill set for the enhancement and assessment of robotic surgical performance. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 111 2005. pp. 418-421
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